Peer Resources Index | Mentor Index | Coaching Index | Mentor Learning Index

Logo

The Mentor Hall of Fame

MENTORS IN BUSINESS, INDUSTRY, EDUCATION, SCIENCE, ARCHITECTURE and METAPHYSICS

Virtually anyone can benefit from having a mentor. One of the oldest ways to pass on wisdom and knowledge from one generation of professionals to another has been through mentoring.

The following list of mentor pairs was compiled by Rey Carr from a variety of sources including autobiographies, biographies, newspaper articles, personal interviews, and diligent historical research.

If you know of mentor pairs that ought to be added, we have provided an opportunity for you to submit the names and details: Add a Mentor Pair.

MENTORS IN BUSINESS, INDUSTRY, EDUCATION, MEDICINE, AND SCIENCE
  • When British-born Victoria, British Columbia property developer Chris LeFevre was asked in a 2007 interview if he had a mentor, he replied "No, I can't confess to having a mentor. I'm a bit of a single-minded cuss and I ploughed my own trail pretty much. It certainly wouldn't be everyone's cup of tea to be involved in such a mixed bag of diversity."

  • Victoria, British Columbia born hotel owner and developer, award-winning Terry Farmer is a mentor to John Espley, former chair of the Victoria Chamber of Commerce. In a speech given at the Lifetime Achievement Award ceremony, the speaker said this about Mr. Farmer, "Terry has often provided mentoring to young people interested in business. His specialty is providing guidance to those that want to become entrepreneurs. He's delighted to help them get that gem of an idea off the ground by providing advice and cultivating the raw ambition, brains and enthusiasm that are key to any successful business person. As part of his mentoring process, Terry wants to make sure that the next generation of business leaders is well rounded." Mr. Farmer responded by saying, "Our society depends on our young people, but we have to encourage them in their efforts. We also have to encourage our young people to get involved and give back. Join community organizations, give back to our society."

  • Canadian Director of Aboriginal Recruitment and Cultural Safety for British Columbia's Ministry of Children and Family Development Wedidi Speck has mentored youth since 1980 in correctional settings, middle and high school, and community. He also mentored adults in the community setting. Here's his viewpoint on mentoring, "Mentorship as I have been raised to understand it, is a way of life. It is about how you hold yourself in the world, it is how you model to others a way of being in that world and it is a tool constructed with the elements of compassion, empathy, wisdom and inclusiveness. The very aim of mentorship is to afford someone an opportunity to connect to an experience, idea and action. Our leadership, facilitation and modeling in this context is aimed at being humble, encouraging, and healing. As mentors we work with the mindset of discovery the openness of child, the courage of a warrior and mindfulness of a sage. In preparing me for my hereditary chieftainship, my mentorship training has been culturally formal and has come from many great Kwakwaka'wakw chiefs and elders. The mentors have included the late Chiefs: James Sewid, Alvin Alfred, Bill Scow, Bill Roberts, JJ Wallas and Sam Scow. Elder noble women have included: Lucy Brown, Ethel Alfred, Katie Adams, Emma Hunt, Agnes Cranmer, Maggie Cook, Dora Alfred, and Nellie Cook. They each have invested hundreds of hours where stories, experiences and cultural etiquette has been shared. The mentorship started when I was 21 years of age for twenty-five years."

  • One of Canada's leading neuroscientists Laurent Descarries (1939-2012) was described as "an exceptional mentor: he trained more than 60 graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and visiting scientists, many of whom now have their own laboratory or are leading figures of the Canadian research scene."

  • For a person who didn't think of himself as a mentor, Purdy Crawford (1932-2014), a Canadian legal expert and business executive, left a legacy of many people he mentored. One of those he mentored, Bertha Wilson (1923-2007) became the first woman to serve as a justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. At a time when women were struggling to gain access to the old boy's club of legal firms in Toronto, Purdy Crawford hired her to work with him, and acted as an advocate or sponsor for her early career advancement. Gordon Pitts, who wrote a book about Mr. Crawford said that Crawford's "greatest contribution to Canada was serving as a personal mentor for generations of young people who now form a who's who of Canada's most influential leaders," including Canada's Governor General David Johnston, and the CEO's of some of Canada's major corporations. Mr. Crawford's obituary in the August 16 issue of the Globe and Mail newspaper reported that "Deborah Alexander, executive vice-president and general counsel at Bank of Nova Scotia said Mr. Crawford was her most important mentor as a young lawyer," and that much of her personal success is attributable to him.

  • Victoria, British Columbia-born Canadian teacher, counsellor and athlete Donald Frampton (1946-2017) was described as a person who "impacted the lives of many young people he taught and mentored."

  • New Zealand-born British physicist Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) was a mentor to Exeter, Ontario-born Harriet Brooks (1876-1933) who was Canada's first female nuclear physicist. While she also worked with Marie Curie (1867-1934), she was forced to abandon her work when she married in 1907.

  • Canadian philanthropist and advocate for innovative health initiatives Sandra Rotman was awarded membership in the Order of Canada in part because she "founded a program designedto empower individuals with mental health challenges by providing them with business loads and mentorship."

  • Canadian literacy studies author and essayist and the author of Canada and the Idea of North Sherrill Grace was awarded membership in the Order of Canada in part because she "is an important mentorto young scholars across Canada."

  • Senior doctor in the Canadian army and inspector general of military hospitals in Canada, British-born James Miranda Stuart Barry (1795-1865) was a woman who disguised herself as a man so that she could study medicine and be a doctor. According to her biography on Historica Canada, her "long-kept secret was discovered when she died and was laid out for burial."

  • The first female doctor to practise in Canada and an activist for women's rights and suffrage, Emily Stowe (1831-1903) was a mentor to Canadian social reformer and spiritualist Flora MacDonald Merrill (1867-1921).

  • Dryden, Ontario-raised Canadian Keiran McMonagle designs comprehensive mentoring programs for at-risk Aboriginal children and youth.

  • Swiss-born American child neurologist and educator Dr. Isabelle Rapin (1927-2017), whose ideas, the Globe and Mail said, "helped establish autism's biological underpinnings and advanced the idea that autism was part of a broad spectrum of disorders". The newspaper article also stated that "Over the years, Dr. Rapin became a mentor to other female neurologists."

  • A chemist, university professor and grandfather Philip Coppens (-2017), who developed photocrystallography (X-ray science) was "renowned for promoting the discipline, organizing interntional meetings, and mentoring younger colleagues in his field."

  • African American mathematician and aerospace engineer Mary Jackson (1921-2005) was the first African-American female engineer to work at NASA, was mentored by Polish aeronautics engineer Kazimierz Czarnecki (1916-2005).

  • While working as a chemist at Dupont to find a substance to strengthen radial tires, Pennsylvania-born Stephanie Kwolek (1923-2014) discovered Kevlar, a substance that is 50 times stronger than steel and best known for its use in body armor, bulletproof vests, other protective equipment, as well as in a variety of sports equipment. Right from her initial discovery of this polymer she credited all the members of her research team with aiding in the discovery. As a result of Kevlar's ability to save lives, a Kevlar Survivors' Club was formed which was a partnership between DuPont and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. The former manager of the club, a retired police chief said at least 3,200 lives were saved by Kevlar, and one of them was his son, who served in Iraq. "When you think about what she has done, it's incredible. There's literally thousands and thousands of people alive because of her. She could look back on her life and say, 'Yeah, I made a difference.'" Ms. Kwolek's mentoring of younger scientists, especially women and young children, resulted in a variety of awards including the 1999 Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award.

  • Born in Turin, Italy, Rita Levi-Montalcini (1909-2012) had to overcome her father's objections that women should not study in order to obtain her degree in medicine and surgery from Turin University in 1936. She often credited her own mentor, anatomist and professor of anatomy Giuseppe Levi (1872-1965), for her success. Her early career in Italy during the Fascist regime was hampered because as a Jew she was banned from working at a university. Instead she carried out her experiments in the bedroom of her home where she studied chicken embryos, but the German invasion of Italy forced her and her family to go underground. When eggs became scarce during the war, she would bike around the countryside to buy them from farmers. In 1947 she was invited to work at Washington University in St Louis. Her research on the growth of cells increased the understanding of many conditions, including tumors and senile dementia. She won the Nobel Prize in 1986 for her discovery of nerve growth factors. The women scientists she mentored believed they learned tenacity, focus, the power of the mind, and the importance of relationships as a result of her attention to their development.

  • Author, researcher, and entrepreneur, Dr. Masaru Emoto (1943-2014) had a passion for teaching his "Messages in Water." He trained over 350 instructors from around the world to teach new generations about the truth and sacredness of water as he outlined in his book, Hidden Messages from Water and the Universe. His followers and those he mentored believe their lives were changed personally and collectively by his pioneering research which they believe resulted in a wave of transformation, awakening and shift in collective consciousness around the planet. Those he mentored believe he gave them a greater sense of themselves and an ability to create positive change by shifting their thoughts, words, emotions and intentions. Louise Hay said his work "gave me a new respect for water. I began blessing with love every glass of water I drank. Labels with positive words and affirmations soon appeared on my faucets, showerhead, garden watering cans, the toilets, every other water source I had, and all the many bottles of water I carried everywhere." His last words were "Arigatou". ("Thank you" in Japanese), which in Japanese means to be grateful for our own existence.

  • Marshall Rosenberg (1934-2015), founder of the Center for Nonviolent Communication, was a world renowned peacemaker, psychologist, educator and author. He dedicated his life to the study and practice of the conditions that bring about peace. He taught millions, through his books and talks, the skills of honest expression, empathy, naming feelings, and asking for what we need in order to enrich our lives. His early experience living in racially divided Detroit while he was training as a psychologist contributed to his developing a way to address conflict that emphasizes listening with empathy. He was also influenced in this direction by his association with the renowned psychologist Carl Rogers (1902-1987) who became his mentor, and asked him questions that were unanswerable at the time about how people can be loving and violent at the same time. The Greater Good Center at the University of California at Berkeley said, "Dr. Rosenberg's passing is a great loss to those inspired by his embodied, practical approach to peacemaking. And yet his work lives on as an inheritance, one that we may discover, rediscover and invest in ourselves and in one another, sharing these instruments of harmony that were meant to be shared in a diverse, complex, and complicated world." One of fans of his work said, "Marshall Rosenberg is the mentor I wish we'd all had growing up. We learned to speak but not communicate and that has led to so much unnecessary personal and social misery."

  • Provocative, controversial, and energizing, Dr. Albert Ellis (1913-2007), the creator of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), was one of the most influential psychologists of the 20th century, and his work on cognitive psychology, action orientation, confronting irrational beliefs, the importance of emotional growth, and challenge to the prevailing dominance of psychoanalytic psychotherapy, gave rise to one of the foundations of what is today called cognitive coaching. As a student in high school Albert Ellis planned on studying accounting, make enough money to retire at age 30, and become the great American novelist. He devoted most of his time to writing short stories, plays, novels, comic poetry, essays and non-fiction books. The Depression that began in 1929 reduced his brief interest in a business career, and he found that non-fiction writing was more to his liking than producing fiction. He started to write about the field of human sexuality, and became a noted expert and informal counselor in this area. His peer counseling led him to discover his calling in this field, and he began to steer towards a career in clinical psychology. When he received his doctorate in clinical psychology from Columbia University in 1947 he was an ardent supporter of psychoanalysis. But his faith in this technique began to wane when he found that clients stayed the same whether he met with them daily or weekly. He started to inject advice into the sessions and discovered that his clients actually improved when he pointed out their "crooked way of thinking." One of his critics believed this patient improvement was just a way to get Dr. Ellis to stop talking. Dr. Ellis, however, believed that patients had to take immediate action to change their behavior. "Neurosis," he said, was "just a high-class word for whining." Rey Carr adds, "In 1965 when I was a graduate student in a clinical-school psychology program, the film Three Approaches to Psychotherapy was the most frequently viewed and widely-discussed movie about therapy. In the film, Albert Ellis (Rational-Emotive), Carl Rogers (Client-Centered) and Fritz Perls (Gestalt) took turns conducting therapy with the same patient: "Gloria." At the end of the 36-minute film, the producer and director of the film, Everett Shostrom, interviewed Gloria about her experience of therapy with the three greats and rivals. As students we argued late into the night on many occasions about the therapists' techniques and Gloria’s reactions. Dr. Ellis always seemed to receive the most criticism because of his abrupt and abrasive manner, but when he was scheduled to be a keynote speaker at the American Psychology Association conference in our city, all the students eagerly got tickets to the event. As part of his talk, he solicited a volunteer from the audience so that he could demonstrate some of the principles of REBT. His interaction with the volunteer was surprisingly humorous…and provocative." As a result of his style he was nicknamed "the Lenny Bruce of psychotherapy." (For those too young to remember Lenny Bruce, he was probably the first stand-up comedian to focus on politics, civics, and real events in highly caustic rants filled with "forbidden" words.) I remember one of my fellow students saying after the demonstration, "Dr. Ellis has some great ideas and practices for helping people make significant changes. Too bad he's the one using them." Dr. Ellis published over 54 books and 600 articles on REBT, and at the time of his death he was President Emeritus of the Albert Ellis Institute (formerly the Institute of Rational Living) in New York.

  • While many management gurus are men, Mary Parker Follett (1868-1933) has been largely forgotten in the history of management. She was the first to apply human psychology and human relations to industrial management. She went to Radcliffe College–a coordinate college of Harvard University–though, being a woman, she was denied a degree. From there, she became a voluntary social worker and founded social community centres in and around Boston. Her contribution to the development of management theory can be seen as a contrast to the scientific management theories of the early 1900's. Unlike the approach of time-and-motion advocates such as American mechanical engineer Frederick W. Taylor (1856-1915), Mary argued for a human relations approach that was well before its time, and eventually served as an influence in the work of Austrian management guru Peter Drucker (1909-2005) and others. In a 1924 essay on "Power", she coined the phrases 'power-over' and 'power-with', observing that groups work more effectively when power is shared and people are empowered. Her ideas about shared power, mutuality, and reciprocity formed the basis for much of modern day mentoring. Her books, in part, served as the foundation for the Human Relations Movement of the mid-20th century of management gurus such as American psychologist and human needs specialist Abraham Maslow (1908-1970), clinical psychologist and management pioneer Frederick Herzberg (1923-2000) and Australian-born management psychologist Elton Mayo (1880-1949). She said, "It seems to me that whereas power usually means power-over, the power of some person or group over some other person or group, it is possible to develop the conception of power-with, a jointly developed power, a co-active, not a coercive power."

  • Jay Cross (1944-2015) was the author of the book Informal Learning: Rediscovering the Natural Pathways that Inspire Innovation and Performance, described as the turning point for the learning industry. He was often referred to as the Johnny Appleseed of informal learning, and he is credited with creating the term "e-learning." He challenged the conventional wisdom about how adults learn, and he inspired and had a lasting impact on many learning practitioners. One of those he influenced said, "I remember being struck by his interest in what I was doing. He had a natural curiosity and wanted to explore why I was doing what I was doing, and the learning value that came out of it for me." Another said, "Jay's contribution to the field of organisational learning was huge. He made us think hard about the edges of our profession. When many were fretting about perfecting the irrelevant with better classroom courses, Jay was pulling us into the emerging world of eLearning. When most were still focused on integrating eLearning into courses and curricula, Jay was shouting that the real power wasn't in structured learning at all but in workplace and in informal and social learning approaches." "He was a mentor and colleague. Whenever I was struggling with an idea or needed some creative diversion, Jay was the person I called."

  • Eric Parsloe (1938-2015), who was a pioneer in and advocate for mentoring in the U.K. and around the world and a founder of the European Mentoring and Coaching Council (EMCC), was a mentor to many.

  • Dr. Joan Eveline, a professor at the University of Western Australia was a mentor to Dr. Jen de Vries, Senior Academic Fellow in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne. Dr. de Vries, who studies the distinction between mentoring and sponsorship within higher education said of her mentor, "We worked alongside each other on various projects to do with gender equality at the University of Western Australia. Her belief in me and my contribution was important to my aspirations and she later became my PhD supervisor. Unfortunately she fell ill and did not last the distance. However her work lived on in the lives of others, including myself."

  • Israeli university professor and Director of the Biofilm Research Laboratory Doron Steinberg is a mentor to university microbial biofilms researcher Michael Brandwein.

  • CEO or Chairman of L.L. Bean for more than 46 years, Leon Gorman (1935-2015) was a mentor to American Chris McCormick, the president and CEO of L.L. Bean in 2015.

  • Legendary basketball coach John Wooden (1910-2010) is a mentor to best-selling author, speaker and inspirational consultant Jon Gordon. Here are seven lessons Mr. Gordon learned from Coach Wooden: 1. Success Is All About the Little Things - On the first day of practice Coach Wooden didn't discuss basketball strategy. Believe it or not, he taught his players the proper way to put on their socks and shoes so they didn't get blisters. 2. Focus on the Process, Not the Outcome - Coach Wooden didn't focus on winning. He focused on the character of his team, key fundamentals, daily improvement, effort, potential and selfless teamwork. As a result he won...a lot. 3. There's No Such Thing as an Overnight Success - Wooden was at UCLA 16 years before they won their first national title. Today we live in a world where people expect instant results. If a coach doesn't win a title in a few years he or she is fired. Wooden is a testament that greatness takes time. 4. Selfless Teamwork is Great Teamwork - Wooden said, "A player who makes a team great is much more valuable than a great player." 5. There's Power in Humility - Norman Vincent Peale said that humble people don't think less of themselves. They just think of themselves less. Wooden made his life about coaching, leading and developing others and in doing so exhibited true power. 6. Faith Matters - In our politically correct world where people are afraid to mention God, even though it says it on the US dollar bill and is mentioned in our pledge, I find it interesting how in all the media reports about Wooden they talk positively about how his faith guided his life, principles and actions. There is power in faith. More importantly there is enormous power when your faith moves you to love, serve, inspire, coach and make a difference. 7. Your Legacy Matters - The most important thing you will leave behind when you die is your legacy. And the greatest legacy you can leave is your life, your principles and the lives you touch. Wooden didn't spend his life amassing wealth and trying to make a fortune. He invested in others. And while buildings will fall, jewelry will tarnish and money will get spent, his legacy will live on in those who carry his teachings in their heart.

  • Chief executive officer of LinkedIn, Jeff Weiner calls philanthropist and humanitarian Ray Chambers his mentor. He says that his mentor taught him many things: "Among many things that Ray has taught me are five rules for happiness. So the first one is living in the moment. The second is that it's better to be loving than to be right, and if you're in a relationship, you know how challenging that can be. The third one is to be a spectator to your own thoughts, especially when you become emotional, which is almost impossible to do. The fourth is to be grateful for at least one thing every day, and the last is to help others every chance you get. So I'm incredibly fortunate to have people in my life like that."

  • F. Sherwood Rowland (1923-2012), Nobel Prize winning chemist who crusaded against man-made chemicals that were harming the Earth's ozone layer was a mentor to Kenneth Janda, dean of the University of California, Irvine physical sciences department.

  • Jacob Goldman (1921-2011), a physicist, was the chief scientist at Xerox in the 1960’s. While there he founded the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), which invented the modern personal computer. At the time computers were typically not available in offices, and little was known about what shape the invention of the personal computer would take for the office of the future. Mr. Goldman’s vision convinced Xerox to invest in the future, even if it didn’t know what to do with the returns. PARC researchers designed a number of innovations including the Alto personal computer, the Ethernet office network, laser printing, and the graphical user interface. The technologies he spearheaded eventually were commercialized by Apple and Microsoft, prompting Mr. Goldman to lament in a 1988 interview: "Xerox's failure was part of a large corporation's unwillingness to take risks. Look at the personal computer industry today. It's a multibillion-dollar industry. And we at Xerox could have had that industry to ourselves."

    He acted as a mentor to many scientists and helped them to create a larger vision for whatever projects they created. He brought the idea to management that they may have to wait some time to gain practical value from scientific work.

  • American musicologist, historian, author and professor of music Philip Gossett (1941-2017) is a mentor to American musicologist Douglas Ipson (@Douglpson); author and musicologist Hilary Poriss; musicologist Francesco Izzo; and American operatic tenor Gregory Kunde, who said of his mentor, "I had quite a few occasions to work with him when he was “musical consultant” on some Rossini works. Philip always had time for you and your questions about Rossini and of course, always had a solution as well. But most importantly, he always had a smile for you."

  • American philosophy professor Leonard Linsky (1922-2012) is a mentor to Irl Barefield and Alexandra Bellow.

  • Swiss-born American psychoanalyst who maintained an active practice when she was over 100 years old Hedda Bolgar (1909-2013) was a mentor to American philanthropist and corporate executive Joan Willens Beerman.

  • Russian neurologist and developmental psychologist Alexsandr Luria (1902-1977); British-American poet W.H. Auden (1907-1973); American psychologist Jerome Bruner (1915-2016); and American psychoanalyst Leonard Shengold were all mentors to neurologist and bestselling author Oliver Sacks (1933-2015).

  • Best-selling and award-winning American author, Los Angeles prosecutor and district attorney Vincent Bugliosi (1934-2015), who won 105 of his 106 felony trials is a mentor to bestselling author, former reporter, and teacher Bruce Henderson. Mr. Bugliosi give him this writing advice: "I can tell you in three words what every good nonfiction book must have: details, details, details."

  • American law professor and author and specialist in negotiation and conflict resolution Roger Fisher (1922-2012), whose work partly led to the Israeli-Egyptian peacy treaty (Camp David Accords) with U.S. President Jimmy Carter was a mentor to award-winning William Ury, bestselling author and co-founder of the Harvard Negotiation Project; and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Proram Daniel Shapiro.

  • Austrian-born Benedictine monk and author of several works on the interaction between spirituality and science, David Steindl-Rast is a mentor to American professor psychology, leading expert on the science of gratitude and author of Thanks! How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier Dr. Robert A. Emmons.

  • Founder of the Highlander Folk School which is focused on community organizing for social justice and was attended by both Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks, Myles Horton (1905-1990), an educator, and socialist, is a mentor to action learning consultant and peer group learning expert Dr. Carter McNamara.

  • Abbot Buddhist monkSomdet Chuang was a mentor to Buddhist monk Phra Dhammachayo.

  • American civil rights attorney, politician and media mogul Percy Sutton (1920-2009), who was the son of a former slave and was a member of the famed Tuskegee Airmen in the Second World War, was a mentor to Rev. Jesse Jackson.

  • British pilot, farmer, and war plane transport specialist Diana Barnato Walker (1918-2008) was a mentor to many female pilots and an advocate from women flyers. She encouraged generations of women to fly, so that no one today can ever say that aircraft are purely "boy's stuff." Award-winning American transplant surgeon Thomas Starzl (1926-2017) is a mentor to American transplant surgeon Andreas Tzakis, Abhinav Humar, clinical director of a medical institute and chief of surgery and John Fung, director of transplant surgery.

  • Russian socialist and Rabbi Salman Rabinkow (1882–1942) was a mentor to German psychoanalyst, philosopher and author Erich Fromm (1900-1980), who was a mentor to Hugh Gillian.

  • US secretary of defense Jim Mattis is a mentor to US retired vice admiral Robert Harward.

  • Canadian computer scientist and philanthropist and former University of British Columbia undergraduate and University of Waterloo graduate student and currently is a professor at Stanford University is a mentor to the founders of Google, David Cheriton, has donated more than $27 million to Canadian universites to benefit thousands of science students.

  • British-born Canadian sociology professor, psychoanalyst, an early director of the Canadian Mental Health Association, and political activist John Seeley (1913-2007) was a mentor to Canadian criminal justice lawyer Clayton Ruby, who said "He was more important in my life than either of my parents. Canadian journalist Rick Salutin said of his mentor, "He picked up everything I was concerned about before I'd finished the sentence and replied, as always, with astute sensitive advice." Professor Seeley's son said when his father was ill and passing, "you could feel all of what he had distributed around the world coming back to him in letters, visits and phone calls, and so many of them said the same thing: that he had touched their lives in a way that nobody else had and that he was like a father to them."

  • Pioneering American cancer researcher Judah Folkman (1933-2008) was considered a mentor to generations of scientists such as tissue engineering pioneer, entrepreneur, and MIT professor Robert Langer. Dr. Folkman taught those he mentored, "If your idea succeeds, everybody says you're persistent. If it doesn't succeed, you're stubborn."

  • Award-winning Canadian lawyer, women's rights and justice advocate and the person who coined the term "environmental crisis" Michelle Swenarchuk (1948-2008) was mentored by Quebec labour activist, aboriginal rights activist and feminist Madeleine Parent (1918-2012), Canadian labour union executive and author Doris Anderson (1921-2007), and German-born Canadian research physicist Ursula Franklin (1921-2016).

  • Canadian Sheela Basrur (1956-2008) was Toronto's Chief Medical Officer. When she witnessed the arrival of the deadly severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, she immediately moved into problem-solving mode. She worked three weeks straight after the first cases were discovered. She led the team that charted the SARS course, trying to build firewalls between the infected and those who were vulnerable to its path. Health workers were dying along with SARS patients.
    As reported in the Globe and Mail, "a female co-worker remembers bumping into Dr. Basrur one day during the crisis as she emerged from a washroom. The co-worker told Dr. Basrur that she looked wonderful and the doctor responded by saying she felt tired. The co-worker said, 'Sheela, you're great. The whole city loves you and is counting on you. And this morning on the radio I heard the host of the morning show say that he knew it was okay to go out because the little doctor with the glasses said it was.' Dr. Basrur laughed and hugged the woman in delight and went off to try and save more lives. Several years later, the co-worker e-mailed Dr. Basrur and asked if she remembered the incident. She said 'yes, but I believe he said cute little famous doctor with the glasses.'"
    Colleagues described Dr. Basrur as a mentor for clear communication. One public health official said Dr. Basrur's gender, height, skin colour, and articulateness acted as a catalyst for her own choice of public health as a career. One of those Dr. Basrur mentored formulated a reason to pay the mentoring forward: "In memory of Dr.Basrur, I will make time to speak to young Canadians about their career choices, especially those who may identify with me ethnically or otherwise. I can't pretend to have all the answers, but if I can help someone to ask the right questions, as Dr. Basrur did for me, that may be enough.

  • American businessman, philanthropist, war protestor Stewart Mott (1937-2008) created the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation when his father refused to let him be part of the existing family foundation. The Mott Foundation is one of the greatest supporters of mentoring initiatives in the United States.

  • American law professor Ruth Okediji is a mentor to ImeIme Umana, the first Black president of the Harvard Law Review.

  • Russian scientometrics expert, philosopher and humanist Vassily V. Nalimov (1910-1997) was a mentor Eugene Garfield (1925-2017), a pioneer in scientific communication and information science, gave generously of his time to mentor young professionals starting out in the information science field.

  • Nobel laureate and physics professor Rosalyn Yalow (1921-2011) was a mentor to award-winning Mildred Dresselhaus (1930-2017), an advocate for women in science and scientist who was known as the "Queen of Carbon" for her research and the first woman to be named full professor at M.I.T.

  • American inventor, explorer, and entrepreneur, Harold "Doc" Edgerton (1903-1990), the inventor of high-speed photography and the stroboscope, was a mentor to many of his students including electrical engineer and former president of M.I.T. Paul Gray.

  • Canadian inventor Henry Woodward (1832-1921), whose patent for an electric light bulb preceeded those by Thomas Edison, was a mentor to
  • American engineer and explorer Franklin Leonard Pope (1840-1895) was a mentor to American inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

  • Former Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) president and staunch defender of human rights and social justice Bob White (1936-2017) is a mentor to current CLC president Hassan Yussuff.

  • Award-winning meterological scientist Thomas F. Malone was a mentor to former Chief of the U.S. Weather Bureau Robert M. White (1923-2015).

  • American game hunter Ray Alt is a mentor American guide and outdoor equipment company executive Brendan Burns.

  • French philosopher and literary theorist Roland Barthes (1915-1980) was a mentor to French literary theorist, intellectual historian, philosopher, author of The Conquest of America and Facing the Extreme Tzvetan Todorov (1939-2017).

  • London-born Nobel Prize winner for medicine in 2003 Peter Mansfield (1934-2017), a pioneer in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was a mentor to many other researchers who worked in his lab at the University of Nottingham's School of Physics and Astronomy. His work revolutionized the detection of disease.

  • Mike Illitch (1929-2017), an entrepreneur who owned Detroit sports teams and founded an international fast food franchise and paid Rosa Parks rent, was a mentor to NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman.

  • Canadian technology entrepreneur and former CEO Gerri Sinclair is a mentor to Aoife Dowling, manager of digital strategy at a Vancouver-based credit union. Mr. Sincliar says, "My first thought when I think about mentorship is my own mentors and how I would love to apply what I've learned from them and the way they treated me."

  • Founder and chair of the Forum for Women Entrepreneurs Canadian Christina Anthony is a mentor to Lisa Niemetscheck, general manager, Forum for Women Entrepreneurs.

  • Canadian entrepreneur Erin Athene is a mentor to Jason Guille, Canadian producer and musician.

  • Canadian YWCA CEO Janet Austin is a mentor to Fiona Douglas-Crampton, business executive.

  • Canadian computer science professor Yvonne Coady is a mentor to software developer Rebecca Dunn-Krahn.

  • Canadian entrepreneur, board member and speaker Judy Brooks is a mentor to Val Litwin, President and CEO of the British Columbia Chamber of Commerce.

  • Canadian mechanical engineering professor Elizabeth Croft is a mentor to Canadian university electrical and computer engineering professor Dana Kulic.

  • Financial investor Bonnie Foley-Wong is a mentor to Canadian Jennifer Li, co-founder and CEO of MuseFind in Vancouver, BC.

  • Canadian lawyer Anne Giardini is a mentor to corporate executive Wendy King.

  • Canadian professor of information systems Rebecca Grant is a mentor to Jordyn Hrenyk, producer, Animikii, Inc in Victoria, British Columbia.

  • Canadian hospital executive Barbara Grantham is a mentor to Teija Beck, Canadian hospital executive.

  • Digital strategist Shauna Harper is a mentor to Canadian media executive Camille MacDonald.

  • Law firm partner Elizabeth Harrison is a mentor to Denise Nawata, law firm partner.

  • Canadian medical school professor Maria Issa is a mentor to Society of Canadian Women in Science and Technology president Christin Wiedemann.

  • Canadian chief inclusiveness officer Fiona MacFarlane is a mentor to Louisa Lun, senior manager, EY, Vancouver.

  • Canadian university director of entrepreneurship Sarah Lubik is a mentor to Lauren Watkins, marketing manager.

  • Canadian business executive Lois Nahirney is a mentor to Stephanie Bruckner, market research manager.

  • Canadian co-founder, president and CEO of a domain service Cybele Negris is a mentor to Shannon Cole, telecommunications manager.

  • Canadian executive banker Nancy McKinstry is a mentor to Shelly Appleton-Benko, Canadian financial adviser.

  • Canadian financial business partner Michelle Osry is a mentor Moses Richu, business analyst.

  • Canadian liquor executive Barbara Philip is a mentor to Michaela Morris, journalist and educator.

  • Canadian business executive Elizabeth Watson is a mentor to Teresa Budd, lawyer and consultant.

  • American business executive and author Jay Abraham is a mentor to corporate coach and author Stephen Fairley.

  • Canadian business founder Carla Wood is a mentor to Stephanie Ratcliff, account director.

  • Canadian arts centre director Donna Spencer has been a mentor to many actors and producers.

  • Canadian Laurel Douglas, the head of the Women's Enterprise Centre and responsible for matching thousands of entrepreneurs with women mentors is also a mentor to Tammy Moore, the CEO of the ALS Society of Canada.

  • Career guru and former clergyman, Richard Bolles (1927-2017), the author of the multi-milliion-seller What Color is Your Parachute, and others, was a mentor to many people who were dealing with outsourcing, downsizing, mergers and other corporate strategies that eroded traditional notions of job security.

  • Nutrition and fitness expert and blogger, J.J. Virgin is a mentor to Ayurvedic medical practitioner and energy worker Keesha Ewers.

  • Canadian pharmacist and entrepreneur Naz Rayani is a mentor to Canadian pharmacist Ian Lloyd.

  • Gas chromatographer A.I.M. Keulemans (1908-1977), Italian-born American chemist and chromatography scientist Steve Dal Nogare (1922-1968), and Nobel prize winner in chemistry and English scientist A.J.P. Martin (1910-2002) were mentors to scientist, gas chromatographer, and emeritus professor Harold McNair. Dr. McNair described the mentoring he received from Dr. Dal Nogare, "He basically kicked my butt and then two hours later came by and gave me a hug. He had enough respect for his students and colleagues to say, 'Here's where you're screwing up, but let's maintain a friendly relationship as well.' I appreciated that and learned from that." Harold McNair became a mentor to many of this students. One of those he mentored who became a professor and chair of a univeristy department of biochemistry said, "Watching Harold, it became clear to me the extent to which a career in science could and should be a collaborative, international effort driven by interpersonal relationships built on mutual respect. I learned from Harold that, no matter how eminent or busy one might be, one can still make special efforts to compliment a young scientist who has just given a good presentation, make helpful scientific suggestions to any who are interested, and show genuine interest in the professional and personal lives of others."

  • Patrik Frisk, former CEO of a global shoe industry company is a mentor who helped the new Canadian CEO, David Bensadoun, make the leadership transition.

  • Awarded the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom for her tireless work to return ancestral lands to the Blackfoot Nation, Elouise Cobell (1945-2011), also known as Yellow Bird Woman, was a mentor to Angie Main, Executive Director of NACDC and Executive Director of VISIONS and member of the Dickinson University Basketball Hall of Fame member Katherine Dayton.

  • Ana Dominguez, president of Campbell Co. of Canada, provides mentoring to a number of people to help them carve their own path. She describes her role as teaching her mentees to see their passions through enough lifecycles to not only apply the learnings, but to grow from the resulting self-awareness.

  • Dutch-born American professor of computer science Andy Van Dam was a mentor to American professor of computer science and author of the "Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams" Randy Pausch (1960-2008).

  • Economist and business school professor Allan Meltzer is a mentor to conservative economist, former investment banker Adam Lerrick.

    Former president and first chancellor of Boston College and the leader of the Greater Boston One to One Mentoring Initiative for youth Rev. J. Donald Monan (1924-2017) is a mentor to MENTOR co-founder, CEO and executive Geoff Boisi.

  • Master teacher and educator Marva Collins (1936-2015) was a mentor to many.

  • American radio personality and motivational speaker Earl Nightingale (1921-1989) is a mentor to motivational speaker Jim Cathcart and motivational speaker Bob Proctor

  • American author and success speaker Napoleon Hill (1883-1970), author of Think and Grow Rich, was a mentor to motivational speaker Earl Nightingale (1921-1989), businessman Lloyd Conant (1915-1986), and Scottish American industrialist Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919).

  • American motivational speaker Bob Proctor is considered a mentor by Australian-based coach Jill Hutchinson.

  • Mexican Telecom mogul Carlos Slim is a mentor to AT&T head Randall Stephenson.

  • Climate scientist Gordon Hamilton (1966-2016), mentor to many, died in an Antarctica accident.

  • Canadian computer scientist and visionary, Kelly Gotlieb (1921-2016), is a mentor to compter scientist Allan Borodin.

  • Research scientist and chemistry award-winner John D. Roberts (1918-2016) was a mentor to many women scientists. One of those he mentored, Dr. Dorothy Semenow said, "He spearheaded the campaign to get Caltech to admit women."

  • Advocate for automotive safety and creator of "lemon laws" in all 50 US states Clarence Ditlow III (1944-2016) was mentored by consumer advocate, activist and one-time US presidential candidate Ralph Nader.

  • Canadian neurologist Dr. Henry Barnett (1922-2016) mentored many & his research on aspirin saved many.

  • Former Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson (1966-2016) is a mentor to current Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez.

  • Former astronaut and U.S. senator John Glenn (1921-2016) was a mentor to NASA administrator Charles Bolden. John Glenn said, "I think a mentor gets a lot of satisfaction in a couple of ways. They're doing something constructive, so they feel good about that. And when they see the result of this, with the young people they're working with, it's very, very rewarding."

  • U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia (1937-2016) was a mentor to dozens of graduates of the University of Chicago Law School, and lawyer Caroline Rovello.

  • American labour leader & agri-activist Cesar Chavez (1927-1993) was a mentor to boat-rocker, politician and peace advocate Tom Hayden (1939-2016) who was a mentor to Jodie Evans.

  • Canadian pastor and politician J.S. Woodworth (1874-1942), founder of the Canadian Co-operative Commonwealth Federation was a mentor to Canadian politician and minister Tommy Douglas (1904-1986), the father of universal health care.

  • Swiss clinical and developmental psychologist Jean Piaget (1896-1980) was a mentor to developmental neuropsychologist Annette Karmiloff-Smith (1938-2016), who was a mentor to many, including British psychology researcher Teodora Gilga

  • Long-time counseling psychology leader Michael J. Patton (1936-2106) was a mentor to many doctoral students and often helped to launch their careers and achieve national prominence.

  • Described as one of the most widely-despised men in America, lawyer Roy Cohen (1927-1986), is a mentor to former TV-reality star Donald Trump.

  • Pioneer opinion poller and researcher Elmo Roper (1900-1971) was a mentor to pollster, columnist, and grandfather Louis Harris (1921-2016).

  • Feminist icon, pioneering astronomer and Medal of Science award winner Vera Rubin (1928-2016) was a mentor to many young scientists. When Dr. Rubin was told by her high school physics teacher that she'd been awarded a scholarship to Vassar, "he said to me, 'As long as you stay away from science, you should do okay.' It took an enormous self-esteem to listen to things like that and not be demolished." What Dr. Rubin learned from that experience was that "rather than teaching little girls physics, you have to teach them they can learn anything they want to."

  • Infectious disease specialist Dr. Donald A. Henderson (1928-2016), who was known as the "disease detective", eradicated small pox from our planet, saving millions of lives, and was a professor of public health at the University of Pittsburgh, was mentored by the creator of the Epidemic Intelligence Service Alexander Langmuir (1910-1993) at the CDC, and is a mentor to epidemiologist Dr. Stanley Foster and Dr. Donald T. Millar, who worked at the CDC and WHO. Dr. Millar said of his mentor, "He would tell me to go home at the end of the day, kiss the kids, help with dinner and come back and work some more with him." Dr. Henderson was also described by one of his colleagues as a person who "took time to be a mentor to countless young people."

  • Author, trainer, mom, and Yes to Success seminar leader Debra Poneman is a mentor to author and happiness expert Marci Shimoff.

  • Paleontologist, archaeologist and anthropologist Louis Leakey (1903-1972) is a mentor to Biruté Mary Galdikas, president of the Orangutan Foundation International.

  • Pioneering cancer researcher Peter C. Nowell (1928-2017) is a mentor to American professor of pathology at the University of Pennsylvania Jonni S. Moore. Dr. Moore said of her mentor that he was "a generous mentor who, unlike most senior scientists, insisted that she not include his name on her scientific publications, so that she would get full credit for her work. He was unusual in his support for women in science and in urging his trainees to spend more time with their families rather than practically living in the lab. Dr. Nowell’s great strength was his ability to see the big picture in science and to think outside the box."

  • American astronaut and the last man to walk on the moon, Eugene Cernan (1934-2017) is a mentor to NASA astronaut and US Navy test pilot Scott D. Tingle.

  • Nobel Prize-winning microbiologist Selman A. Waksman (1888-1973) was a mentor to Nobel Prize winning microbiologist and anti-biotic pioneer H. Boyd Woodruff (1917-2017).

  • Michigan University award-winning professor Kitty Dickerson (1940-2017) was a pioneer in textiles and a mentor to students.

  • Former Sony CEO Michael Lynton is a mentor to Evan Spiegel, CEO of Snap.

  • New York governor Andrew M. Cuomo is a mentor to U.S. senator of New York Kirsten E. Gillibrand.

  • Author, speaker and businessman Fred Smith, Sr (1915-2007) was a mentor to American author, salesman and motivational speaker Zig Ziglar (1926-2012) who served as a mentor to author, speaker and training Krish Dhanam, author and entrepreneur Seth Godin, and author and speaker Gerry Robert, among others.

  • Financial advisor and motivational speaker Suze Orman is a mentor to Jillian Michaels.

  • Former Apple and Pepsi CEO John Sculley is a mentor to David Steinberg.

  • American author, salesman, and motivational speaker Zig Ziglar (1926-2012) is a mentor to Krish Dhanam and was mentored by Fred Smith, Sr. (1915-2007).

  • Friend of the poor and the oppressed Levi Frisbie (1784-1822) was a mentor to American Transcendentalist poet and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882).

  • Former president of Disney/ABC Television Group Anne Sweeney is a mentor to Richard Ross, Chairman Buena Vista Home Entertainment and was mentored by Walt Disney Company CEO Bob Iger.

  • Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell (1907-1998) is a mentor to retired and first female Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Sandra Day O'Connor.

  • English Physicist J.J. Thomson (1856-1940) was a mentor to New Zealand physicist and father of nuclear physics Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937).

  • Motivational speaker and coach Tony Robbins is a mentor to online fitness coach Jorge Cruise.

  • Math teacher Ed LaRose who also coaches wrestling, track and football at Nature Coast Technical School in the Tampa, Florida was named Hernando County Teacher of the Year because of his mentoring and tutoring of students. Mr. LaRose was the youngest teacher to ever receive this award and just a few short years ago he was a student in the same school district. A colleague described why Mr. LaRose was the top candidate for the award: "Here's a guy who teaches all day, tutors before and after practices, coaches three different sports teams and then goes in early the next morning before school to mentor kids some more. He's young, energetic an really involved." Mr. LaRose said that demonstrating a caring attitude towards students is a key to successful teaching and coaching. "Sometimes it's just taking time to notice them, pulling them aside if they seem down or upset, or taking the time to know what else is going on," Mr. La Rose said. "I think that the key is making sure your students know you don't just want them to pass, you want them to succeed in life."

  • Alain-Dominique Perrin, founder of the Fondation Cartier and president of Cartier, is a mentor to Nicolas Bos, chief executive of Van Cleef & Arpels.

  • Hunter Harrison, CEO of Canadian Pacific Railway, Ltd., is a mentor to Keith Creel, President and COO of Canadian Pacific Railway.

  • American existential psychologist and author Rollo May (1909-1994) was a mentor to Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry (Stanford University) Irvin Yalom and existential-humanistic psychologist and psychotherapist Ed Mendelowitz. Dr. Mendelowitz describes his mentor and friend, who was already in his 70s when they first met, as a person he felt "an immediate attraction to." He describes May as the person who "almost single-handedly introduced European existential psychology to the States." Ed describes his mentor as a person who believed that knowledge was subordinate to wisdom and urged those around him to engage in the joy of thinking. But then, Ed goes on, Rollo May would place his hand on his breast and add, 'By that I mean thinking with the heart.' Not long after I had completed my doctoral studies in Berkeley and repaired to my present home here in Boston, Rollo invited me to join him and his wife Georgia one evening at their summertime farmhouse in the remote town of Holderness, New Hampshire. In his mid-70s by this time, Rollo was strikingly charismatic, at once distinguished and youthful. Surrounded by the beauty of nature, we talked casually about life, world, and profession. Rollo took great pleasure in showing me the flowers he was growing as we sat overlooking Squam Lake where he would canoe daily for exercise. On departing after dinner later that night, I embraced Georgia and walked out with Rollo into the stillness of the New Hampshire night. There was a long circular driveway embedded in shrubbery and trees leading to the farmhouse. After a heartfelt leave-taking, I got into my car and disappeared into the greenery on all sides. As I reached the main road, a clearing suddenly appeared. I glanced back to find my old mentor still standing there and waving affectionately. It is a moment that I will never forget."
  • Mira Godard (1928-2010), Canadian art dealer and gallery owner, is a mentor to Gisella Giacalone, who has been the director of the Godard Gallery since 2003. "I learned everything about life, business and human nature directly from Mira, including loyalty," Ms. Giacalone said in a recent interview; "her voice will be in my mind for the rest of my days."

  • Jim Rohn (1930-2009) is a mentor to Darren Hardy (publisher of Success Magazine)

  • Howard Guttman, author of Coach Yourself to Win: 7 Steps to Breakthrough Performance on the Job and in Your Life, mentored by Bernie Kessler, VP of Human Resources at ADP.

  • Michael A. Grandin (Board chair, Cenovus Energy, Inc) is a mentor to Sherri Brillon (Executive vice-president, chief financial officer, EnCana Corporation, Calgary).

  • Cognitive psychology advocate Dr. Jerome Bruner (1916-2016) mentored many, including Dr. Oscar Chase, Dr. James Gavelek, Dr. Alison Gopnik, Dr. Andrew Meltzoff, and Dr. Andrea Smorti and was mentored by Professor Edwin G. Boring (1886-1968) in the psychology department at Harvard University.

  • Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas was a mentor to award-winning & Iraq-born architect Zaha Hadid (1950-2016)

  • Canadian social justice advocate, Frances Wasserlein (1946-2015), was a mentor to many.

  • James Biosi (1919-2013), real estate lawyer, was a mentor to Mark Rose, Chairman and CEO, Avison Young, who said, "My mentor tuaght me it was my role to teach people to be better than me. Your legacy is to create value in people, companies and culture that you don't shy away from. The other piece of this is keep working hard on yourself and maybe no one will ever catch up to you."

  • Dr. Walter Munk, known as the "Einstein of the Oceans," named Scripps Oceanography Institute scientist Harald U. Sverdrup (1888-1957), a Norwegian oceanographer and meteorologist, his mentor.

  • John Wooden (1910-2010), record holding college basketball coach and leadership guru, is a mentor to John C. Maxwell, leadership expert.

  • Officer of Canada Patrick Reid (1924-2015) was a mentor to Man-in-Motion Leader and Canadian Paralympian Rick Hansen.

  • Dr. Seymour Kety (1916-2000), an expert in biological psychiatry who revolutionized the study of schizophrenia and other major mental illnesses, was a mentor to Dr. Louis Sokoloff (1921-2015), award-winning inventor of brain imaging.

  • Sex researcher Paul Gebhard (1917-2015) was mentored by sex research pioneer Dr. Alfred Kinsey (1894-1956).

  • Twitter product chief Kevin Weil (@kevinweil) considers former Twitter CEO, Dick Costolo (@dickc), his mentor.

  • Productivity specialistEben Pagan is a mentor to Vancouver, BC coach & author Callan Rush.

  • Roy Chitwood (1938-2015), extraordinary sales professional and leader of MaxSacks is a mentor to businessman Willis Turner and dozens of others.

  • DNA scientist, Alexander Rich (1925-2015) was mentored by Nobel Prize scientist Linus Pauling (1901-1994).

  • Psychologist Carl Rogers (1902-1987) was a mentor to non-violent communication speciallist Marshall Rosenberg (1934-2015).

  • Ed Clark (former CEO of TD Bank) is a mentor to his successor, Bharat Masrani (current CEO of Toronto Dominion Bank).

  • Former CEO of Mutual of America Insurance, Wlliam Flynn, is a mentor to retiring CEO Thomas J. Moran.

  • Nobel Prize economist Lloyd Shapley (1924-2016) was a mentor to mathematician John Forbes Nash Jr. (1928-2015). R.I.P.

  • Capitol Music Group (CMG) Chairman and CEO Steve Barnett is a mentor to Scott Greer, the new executive vice-president of CMG.

  • Yale's Robert Abelson is a mentor to Harvard's psychologist/researcher Ellen Langer.

  • Entomologist Jeffery P. LaFage is a mentor to entomologist, Jeffrey A. Lockwood, author of The Infested Mind.

  • Cecilia H. Payne-Gaposchkin (1900-1979), founder of modern astrophysics and first chairwoman of any department at Harvard University was mentored by Harlow Shapley (1885-1972, astronomer and director of Harvard Observatory.

  • Professor Stanley Fischer is a mentor to economist Ben Bernanke.

  • Dr. Mortimer J. Adler (1902-2001, philosopher, author and educator) is a mentor to Arne Duncan (former CEO Chicago Public Schools and currently U.S. Secretary of Education in the Obama administration)

  • Harvard historian Perry Miller (1905-1963) was a mentor to award-winning historian Edmund S. Morgan (1916-2013).

  • Lloyd Dennis (Canadian educator, school principal and author of Living and Learning: The Report of the Provincial Committee on Aims and Objectives of Education in the Schools of Ontario also known as the Hall-Dennis Report) mentor to Heather Birchall (Canadian school principal) who said of her mentor: "I wish I could have told him the impact (inspiring me to have the courage of my convictions) he had on me in my formative years."

  • Historian Stephen Ambrose (1936-2002, Bio) is a mentor to historian, author, and professor of history Douglas Brinkley (Bio)

  • Ron Joyce, founder of Tim Hortons (Bio), is a mentor to Danny Murphy, a fast-food leader and Tim Hortons franchise guru, sometimes called the "Timbit Titan".

  • Brazilian architect Lucio Costa was a mentor to modernist architect Oscar Niemeyer (1908-2012)

  • Millard S. Drexler, CEO of J. Crew, is a mentor to J. Crew designer Jenna Lyons.

  • Leonard Lerman (1925-2012), DNA molecular biologist, is a mentor to Sidney Altman, 1989 Nobel Prize chemist

  • Bruce Ratner, chairman and chief executive, is a mentor to MaryAnne Gilmartin, executive vice-president Forest City Ratner Companies (property developers)

  • Ed Clark, CEO of TD Bank Group (Toronto) mentor to Colleen Johnston, CFO of TD Bank Group (Toronto) and Canada's 2012 CFO of the Year. Ms. Johnston said of Mr. Clark, "He understands the complexity of finance-related issues, and provides excellent coaching in communicating that message to stakeholders. He's always been very helpful [in assisting me] to think through some of those types of conversations with key business partners. Ed Clark is a great role model not just in terms of how he runs the bank, but his humanity, how he treats people and understands the human spirit....As you grow in your business career, you sometimes wonder how much of yourself you can bring into those more senior roles. It's been wonderful at TD to realize that I can be myself no matter what level I'm at." (Quote from Globe and Mail, May 4, 2012)

  • William Densmore (retired senior executive with the Norton Company, Massachusetts) mentor to Paul Reville (Massachusetts Education Secretary) as detailed by Hal Portner in the Boston Mentoring Examiner.

  • Rudi Dornbusch (German economist) mentor to Paul Krugman (Nobel Prize economist) - Details and photos (Requires membership in the Peer Resources Network)

  • Jacques Maximin, French chef, is a mentor to Ferran Adrią, Spanish Chef

  • Stephen Covey (1932-2012) is a mentor to Brian Tracy

  • Sir James Dyson, British industrial designer, mentored by Jeremy Fry (1924-2005) British inventor, adventurer, and engineer

  • Harry Rodman (gold refiner, 1909-2008) mentor to Alan Bronstein (New York diamond dealer), together they assembled the Aurora Pyramid of Hope

  • Paul McKenna (author and hypnotist) calls Richard Bandler (co-creator of NLP) his mentor

  • Jane Loevinger (Psychologist, 1918-2008) mentor to Susanne Cook-Greuter and many others - Details and photos (Requires membership in the Peer Resources Network)

  • Egon Guba (Research and evaluation expert) mentor to dozens of colleauges, faculty and graduate students - Details and photos (Requires membership in the Peer Resources Network)

  • Alexander Konovalov (Russian neurosurgeon) mentor to many others - Details and photos (Requires membership in the Peer Resources Network)

  • Clare Graves (Psychologist, 1914-1986) mentor to Don Beck (Creator of Spiral Dynamics)

  • C. Everett Koop (Former US Surgeon General) mentor to Dr. John M. Templeton, Jr. (physician and head of the Templeton Foundation)

  • Dr. Welton Gersony, pediatric cardiologist, was mentored by Dr. Alexander Nadas (1914-2000), a pioneer in pediatric cardiology.

  • British neuroscientist Patrick Wall (1925-2001, Bio) was a mentor to Canadian Dr. Bruce Pomeranz (1938-2013, Bio), a physician and and physiologist, who discovered endorphins in his research on accupuncture and is known throughout North America as the "Father of Alternative Medicine." Dr. Pomeranz is a mentor to Dr. Jason Lazarou, neuroscientist.

  • Dr. Denton A. Cooley, cardiac surgery pioneer (A HREF="http://texasheart.org/AboutUs/History/cooley.cfm">Bio), is a mentor to Dr. Scott A. Scheinin of Methodist Hospital in Houston.

  • Rudy Lobo (Chief Operating Officer at Regus) mentor to future business leaders and the twin sons of Maria Paitchel (Area Director for Regus). Details.

  • Dr. Arthur Kornberg (Nobel Prize winner for Medicine in 1959) was a mentor to many colleagues and students in his field of biochemistry.

  • Dr. Leslie Orgel (discovered the importance of RNA) was a mentor to many fellow scientists because of his passion, multiple interests, and commitment to collaboration.

  • Freddie Laker mentor to Richard Branson (founder of Virgin Atlantic Airways) told Branson, "Make a fool of yourself. Otherwise you won't survive."

  • Michael Lee-Chin (Chairman of National Commercial Bank in Jamaica, philanthropist, and businessman) was mentored in business by Warren Buffet and names his mother, Hyacinth Gloria Chen, as his life mentor.

  • George Debelle (real estate appraiser) mentor to Gerry McCaughey (CEO, CIBC)

  • E. Paul Torrance (the "Father of Creativity," 1915-2003, Bio) mentor to hundreds of graduate students and university faculty members

  • Alicia Boole Stott (mathematician, Bio) mentor to Donald Coxeter (20th century's leading expert on geometry and Canadian professor, Bio) mentored by Arthur Burns (former US Federal Reserve Chairman)

  • Peter Drucker (1909-2005) (inventor of management consulting) mentor to Jim Collins (Author of Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...and Others Don't and former CEO of the Girl Scouts Frances Hesselbein (Bio).

  • Lee Pulos, PhD (Author of The Power of Visualization) mentor to Adam Dreamhealer

  • Roger Enrico (1944-2016), American businessman and former CEO of PepsiCo, is a mentor to Indra Nooyi, CEO of PepsiCo.

  • Gordon Hollinger (founder of Hollinger Hardware) mentor to Walter Hachborn (retired president and founder of Home Hardware)

  • A.G. Lafley (Chairman and CEO of Procter and Gamble) was told by his mentor, "Have the courage to stick with a tough job."

  • William Denis (Nova Scotia senator) mentor to Ralph Vaughn (journalist and former Air Canada president)

  • Amos Michelson (CEO, Creo) mentor to Judi Hess (President, Creo)

  • Paul Tellier (CEO, Bombardier) mentor to Michael Sabia (CEO, BCE Inc.)

  • George Steinbrenner (Owner, New York Yankees baseball team, Bio) said his mentor told him to "surround yourself with people who were smarter than you are." Little did he know how easy that was going to be.

  • Ace Greenberg (Bear Stearns) was a mentor for Sumner Redstone (Chairman and CEO of Viacom) and told him, "Follow your own instincts, not those of the people who see the world differently."

  • Viacom Board Chairman Sumner M. Redstone (A HREF="http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/sumner_m_redstone/index.html?inline=nyt-per">Bio) is a mentor to Philippe P. Dauman, CEO of Viacom

  • Meg Whitman (CEO and President of eBay) was told, "Be nice, do your best - and most important, keep it in perspective," by her mentor (father).

  • Stuart Friend (KMart manager) mentor to Wayne Sales (CEO of Canadian Tire)

  • Jeffrey Bewkes, the 2012 CEO of Time Warner is a mentor to Richard Pepler, the 2012 CEO of HBO

  • Sallie Krawcheck (CFO of Citigroup) was told by her mentor, "Don't listen to the naysayers."

  • Andrew Carnegie mentor to Charles Schwab (first president of US Steel, Bio)

  • Keith Leighfield of Pembrokeshire won the 2002 Business Mentor of the Year Award from the Prince's Trust for his volunteer work with young people

  • David J. Gearing was elected mayor of Mentor, Ohio with 26 votes in 2002

  • Bill Coleman, Secretary of Transportation under U.S. President Gerald Ford, is a mentor to David George Ball, Assistant Secretary of Labor under U.S. President George H.W. Bush and senior executive at AMAX, Inc.

  • Jim Pattison (CEO, The Jim Pattison Group) mentor to Nick Geer (President and CEO, Insurance Corporation of British Columbia)

  • Jim Shelby (a financial advisor to large and small companies across Tennessee) was a mentor to many throughout the state. He died at age 75 in July, 2012.

  • Sydney Brenner (British researcher and winner of the 2002 Nobel Prize in Medicine) mentor to H. Robert Horvitz (MIT professor and co-winner of the 2002 Nobel Prize in Medicine)

  • Warren Bennis mentor to Tom Peters (author of In Search of Excellence), Bill George (former CEO of Medtronic), Dave Logan (author of Tribal Leadership), and Howard Schultz (CEO, Starbucks) suggested to his mentee "Recognize the skills and traits you don't possess, and hire the people who have them."

  • Douglas McGregor (former president of Antioch College) mentor to Warren Bennis

  • A.G. Osten (Oxford professor) mentor to Baruch S. Blumberg (Nobel Prize in medicine, 1976)

  • Eunice Azzani (partner at Korn/Ferry) mentor to Betsy Bernard (President, AT&T)

  • Leon Levintow (National Institute of Health) mentor to J. Michael Bishop (Nobel Prize winner in medicine, 1989)

  • Patrick Blackett, winner 1948 Nobel Prize in Physics, was a mentor to Bernard Lovell, British radio telescope pioneer.

  • Mr. Broakes (headmaster) mentor to Richard J. Roberts (Nobel prize laureate in medicine, 1993)

  • Colin Reese (professor) mentor to John E. Sulston (Nobel Prize winner in Medicine, 2002)

  • Professor Adachi mentor to Koichi Tanaka (Nobel prize laureate in chemistry, 2002)

  • Karl Bohnoeffer (professor of psychiatry) mentor to Max Delbrück (Nobel laureate in medicine, 1969)

  • Elwood Titus (chemistry professor) mentor to Louis J. Ignarro (Nobel laureate in medicine,1998)

  • Harold Johnston (chemistry professor, Stanford University) mentor to Dudley R. Herschbach (Nobel laureate in chemistry, 1986)

  • Victor Bloomfield (chemistry professor) mentor to Phillip A. Sharp (Nobel laureate in medicine, 1993)

  • George J. Stigler (Nobel Prize economist) mentor to Gary S. Becker (Nobel Prize economist, 1992)

  • Bruno Rossi (cosmic ray physicist) mentor to Riccardo Giacconi (Nobel prize winner in physics and space scientist and specialist in x-ray astronomy)

  • Rosalyn Yanow (Nobel laureate) mentor to Mildred Dresselhaus (MIT physicist)

  • Larry Bossidy (CEO, AlliedSignal) mentor to Bill Amelio (Dell, Senior VP)

  • Steve Ross (former CEO Time Warner) told his mentee, Dick Parsons (Chairman and CEO of Time Warner), "When you negotiate, leave a little something on the table."

  • Vivek Paul (President and CEO, Wipro Technologies) mentored by John Donahoe (President of eBay)

  • Edward Ettin (Federal Reserve Board) mentor to Sherry Cooper (Bank of Montreal Economist)
  • Jimmy Ferraro (found of Supervalu) mentor to William McEwan (supermarket guru)
  • Brian Mulroney (former Prime Minister of Canada) mentor to Karl Péladeau (Quebecor CEO)

  • Helmut Maucher (former CEO, Nestlé) mentor to Peter Brabeck (CEO, Nestlé)

  • Frank Ianna (AT&T Network Services President) mentor to Hossein Eslambolchi (AT&T CTO Labs)

  • Thomas Middlehoff (former CEO, Bertelsmann AG) mentor to Joel Klein (NYC Schools Chancellor)

  • L. Dennis Kozlowski (former CEO, Tyco) mentor to Mark Swartz (CFO, Tyco)

  • John Winborn (CTO, San Francisco Giants) mentored by his mother, Mary Ellen Winborn

  • Bernie Ebbers (CEO, WorldCom) mentor to Scott Sullivan (CTO, WorldCom)

  • Marc Lustgarten (Cablevision Executive) mentor to James Dolan (chairman of Madison Square Garden and president of Cablevision)

  • Vivek Randivé (CEO, Tibco) mentor to John Mathon (CTO, Slam Dunk Networks)

  • Mentor is the name of a four-winged flying robot (or ornithopter) being developed by the University of Toronto

  • Jacques Nasser (former CEO, Ford Motor Co.) mentor to Wolfgang Reitzle (president, Premier Automotive Group)

  • Ed Bersoff (CEO, BTG Group) mentor to Kathy Clark (CEO, Landmark Systems)

  • Gary Rosenthal (designer, Stetson Hats) mentor to Victor Cornejo (designer, Stetson Hatco)

  • William Swindells, Jr. (Chairman, Willamette Industries) mentor to Steve Rogel (Chairman, Weyerhaeuser)

  • Charlie Corvell (CEO, Quebecor World) mentor to Pierre Karl Péladeau (CEO, Quebecor)

  • Bill Bannerman (father) mentor to Monty Bannerman (VP and CTO, Terremark Worldwide)

  • Gerald Levin (former CEO AOL Time-Warner) mentor to Richard Parsons (CEO AOL Time-Warner)

  • David Shaw (Chairman, DE Shaw Co) mentor to Jeff Bezos (CEO Amazon.com)

  • Benjamin Graham (Columbia University professor) and Howard Buffett (dad) mentors to Warren Buffett (CEO, Berkshire Hathaway) told him "You're right not because others agree with you, but because your facts are right.

  • Virtual Mentor is the name of the Ethics Journal of the American Medical Association

  • Former Holy Cross president Rev. John E. Brooks is a mentor to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas: Washington Post

  • Marc Andreessen is a mentor to Mark Zuckerberg

  • Bill Bailey and Earl Shoaff mentors to Jim Rohn (author, motivational speaker, Bio)

  • Jim Rohn (author, motivational speaker) and success coach Jim Britt are mentors to Anthony Robbins (life strategist, author, motivational speaker, Bio)

  • Mary Kay Ash (co-founder Mary Kay Cosmetics) mentor to Tom Wheatley (president fo global sales)

  • Kelly Mahoney (Chief Marketing Officer, Staples) mentored by Robert Finnegan (husband) and Michael Bronner (CEO, Digitas, formerly Bronner, Slosberg Humphrey)

  • Frederick Emmons Terman (Stanford University engineering professor and dean and son of equally famous Stanford psychologist, Lewis Terman) mentor to David Packard and Bill Hewlett (founders of Hewlett-Packard)

  • Mark Shapiro, President and CEO of the Toronto Bluejays is a mentor to Ross Atkins, Bluejays General Manager.

  • Lord Alan Sugar, British philanthropist, is a mentor to Dr. Leah Totton, cosmetic doctor.

  • Dr. Karl Menninger (psychoanalyst, Bio) mentor to Dr. Gordon Warme (psychiatrist and author of The Cure of Folly: A Psychiatrist's Cautionary Tale

  • Dan Woods (CTO, Capital Thinking) mentor to Chad Dickerson (CTO, InfoWorld)

  • Phyllis Yaffe (chief executive, Alliance Atlantis Broadcasting) mentored by Peter Grant (Canadian law firm senior partner)

  • Dalton Camp (advertising executive) mentor to Norman Atkins (1934-2010), Canadian politician and businessman

  • Graham Barnes (former CEO of a Canadian multi-million dollar insurance marketing company) calls Max Kantor and Arthur Johnson (insurance specialists) his mentors

  • Wayne Embry (retired NBA All-Star, bio) is a mentor to Bryan Colangelo (Toronto Raptors president and general manager)

  • Moya Greene (former CEO of Canada Post, currently CEO Royal Mail) mentored by Huguette Labelle, Mark Daniels, and Arthur Kroeger (Canadian deputy ministers)

  • John Weaver (CEO, Abitibi-Consolidated) mentored by Ron Oberlander (former CEO, Abitibi)

  • P.R.S. Oberoi (India hotel executive) mentored by his father, M.S. Oberoi (creator of world-class hotels in India)

  • Robert Rubin (US Treasury Secretary) mentor to Lawrence Summers (President, Harvard University)

  • Lawrence Summers is a mentor Sheryl Sandberg (CEO of Facebook)

  • B.F. Skinner (psychologist, Bio) mentor to Robert Epstein (Editor-in-Chief, Psychology Today) and Nathan Arzin (1931-2013), a behavioural psychologist who worked with humans instead of rats and wrote the 1974 bestseller, "Toilet Training in Less Than a Day."

  • Paul Delage Roberge (CEO, San Francisco stores) mentor to Guy Charron (President, San Francisco stores)

  • Doug Yoon (chief scientist at Logicon) mentor to Joe Neuhaus (CTO, Prime Advantage)

  • Rob Carter (CIO, FedEx) mentor to Paul Orsak (CTO, NextJet)

  • Hilmar Kopper (Deutsche Bank president) mentor to Jurgen Schrempp (CEO, DaimlerChrysler)

  • Charles Simonyi (Distinguished Engineer, Microsoft) mentor to Richard Brodie (creator of Microsoft Word and author of Virus of the Mind: The New Science of Meme)

  • John Bardeen (Nobel Prize winner in physics and co-inventor of transistors) mentor to Nick Holonyak (engineer and inventor of the light-emitting-diode (LED))

  • Niten Shah (vice-president, Lucent) mentor to Steven Spencer (CTO, Screaming Media)

  • Warren Buffet (CEO, Bershire Hathaway) mentor to J. Richard Charlton

  • Mark Starowicz (CBC radio broadcaster) and Brandon Tartikoff (former NBC program director) mentors to Ivan Fecan (Canadian media mogul)

  • Jack Cockwell (CEO, Brascan Ltd) mentor to Kevin Benson (CEO, Canadian Airlines)

  • Kenneth Cole (CEO, Cole Footware) mentored by his father, Charles

  • Peter C. Newman (award-winning Canadian writer) mentor to Robert Lewis (VP, Rogers Media)

  • Linda Hasenfratz (CEO, Linamar Corporation) mentored by her father, Frank

  • Andre Bureau (former chair, CRTC and owner TMN) mentor to Lisa deWilde (president, TMN)

  • Michael Cowpland (former CEO, Corel) mentor to Derek Burney (CEO, Corel)

  • Ann Fudge (Chair and CEO of Young & Rubicam Brands) said the best advice she received from a mentor was "Dont' chart your career path too soon."

  • Ben Montoya (former president and CEO, PNM) mentor to Jeffry Sterba (president, CEO and chairman, PNM)

  • Herb Kelleher (Founder and chairman of Southwest Airlines) was mentored by his mother, Ruth, who told him, "Respect people for who they are, not for what their titles are."

  • Raul Fernandez (CEO, Washington Capitals) mentored by Ted Leonsis (AOL executive)

  • B. Gerald Cantor (founder of Cantor Fitzgerald) mentor to Howard Lutnick (Chairman, Cantor Fitzgerald)

  • Walter A. Stewart mentor to W. Edwards Deming (business consultant, Bio)

  • Don Penny and Dave Norris (founders of Meyers, Norris, Penny) mentors to Daryl Ritchie (current CEO of Meyers, Norris, Penny)

  • The Mentor Group is a Palm Springs company that specializes in appraisal, valuation, and investment banking

  • Peter Munk (Founder and Chairman, Barrick Gold Corp, CEO Trizec Hahn Group) mentor to Randall Oliphant (CEO Barrick Gold Corp)

  • Robert Patterson (CEO, National Cash Register) mentor to Thomas Watson (founder of IBM)

  • Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. (Chair, IBM) mentor to G. Richard Thompson (former CEO Xerox)

  • Peter Drucker says his best advice came from his first editor-in-chief, who told him, Get good or get out."

  • Anne Mulcahy (CEO of Xerox) was told by her mentor, "When everything gets really complicated and you feel overwhelmed, you gotta do three things: first get the cow out of the ditch; second, find out how the cow got into the ditch; and third, make sure you do whatever it takes so the cow doesn't go in the ditch again."

  • Hugh van Horn (Director of the National Science Foundation) mentor to Gilles Fontaine (Award-winning Quebec scientist)

  • Doug Creighton (founder, Toronto Sun) mentor to Paul Godfrey (former CEO Sun Media Corp.)

  • Alf Pouois (former CEO of Noranda) mentor to Bill James (retiring CEO of Inmet Mining)

  • Scott McNealy (Sun CEO) and Paul Austin (Chairman, Coca Cola) mentors to Jack Welch (GE CEO); Mr. Austin told Jack to "Be yourself."

  • Harold Lasswell (Yale professor) mentor to Chen Lung-chu (Chair, Taiwan New Century Foundation)

  • Mentor-on-the-Lake is a city in Ohio with a population of 8271

  • Micheal Pitfield (CEO of Power Corp) mentor to Robert Rabinovitch (CBC president)

  • Mentor - Innovations for the Future is the name of a company that provides mechanical, electronic and optoelectronic components

  • Gordon Osbaldeston (former Clerk of Canada's Privy Council) mentor to Robert Brown (CEO of Bombardier)

  • William Hughes (CEO Nebraska Beef) mentor to Shawn Buchanan (President of All American Meats, Inc.)

  • George Gallup mentor to David Ogilvy

  • Terry Matthews (CEO, Celtic House) mentor to Simon Gibson (CEO of Ubiquity Software Corp)

  • Dan Bentzinger (Senior VP, Transportation.com) mentored by Scott Smith (American Century Investments) and Scott Avidson (Kansas City Southern Railway)

  • Nat Taylor (Canadian movie mogul) mentor to Garth Drabinsky (movie theatre and entertainment company president)

  • Howard Breen (former president of Young and Rubicam) mentor to John Farquhar (president of Young and Rubicam)

  • Bill Gates mentored by the board games "Risk" and "Monopoly"

  • Robert H. Boyle (environmentalist) mentor to Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

  • Warren Buffet (financier) mentor to Donald Graham (publisher, Washington Post) and Micheal Lee-Chin (CEO, AIC)

  • Clare Franz (Latin teacher at Peekskill Military Academy) mentor to Sanford Weill (financier and philanthropist)

  • Alfred Taubman (former chair, Sotheby's) mentor to Diana Dwyer Brooks (former CEO, Sotheby's)

  • In the state of Wisconsin there is a city called Mentor with a population of 521

  • John Chambers (Cisco CEO) mentor to Donald Listwin (former VP Cisco and current CEO Software.com Inc.)

  • Sanford Weill (Chairman Citigroup) mentor to James Dimon (CEO BankOne Corp)

  • John L. Lewis (late president of the United Mine Workers Union) mentor to W.A. (Tony) Boyle (president of the United Mine Workers)

  • Gordon Moore (founder of Intel) and Alois Xavier Schmidt (professor) mentors to Andrew Grove (co-inventor of the microprocessor and chairman of Intel)

  • Andy Grove, Intel co-founder, author, and management expert, 1936-2016) is a mentor to author and investor, Ben Horowitz, who said of his mentor, "He saw something in everyone; he believed in people and their potential. He had the courage and determination to do what's right, and believed in the importance of giving back. He was always so grateful to the USA for allowing him to be a refugee."

  • Barry Diller mentor to Edgar Bronfman and Michael Eisner

  • Bobby Orr (Hall of Fame hockey player) mentor to Dr. Robert Thirsk (astronaut, physician, engineer, scientist)

  • The US Interior Department paired California Condors raised in zoos with wild Condors as their mentors

  • Father Thomas Philippe (chaplain, Trosly-Breuil) mentor to Jean Vanier (Canadian care-giver extrodinaire)

  • John Chisholm (Chief of Police for Toronto) mentor to George Lang (late Toronto Police Staff Superintendent)

  • Henry C. Lawrence (druggist) mentor to Eli Lilly

  • Mentor Township in North Dakota has a population of 31

  • Trevor Clay (late president RCN) mentor to Christine Hancock (General Secretary Royal College of Nursing)

  • William Bass (medical anthropologist) mentor to William Rodriguez (chief deputy US Armed Forces medical examiner)

  • Visit the city of Mentor, Minnesota and meet the 94 people who live there

  • Harry Harlow (psychologist, Bio) mentor to Abraham Maslow (psychologist, Bio)

  • Robert Gagne (learning psychologist Bio) mentor to Bruce Tuckman (professor, Ohio State Bio)

  • Richard Hofstadter (historian and winner of 1956 Pulitizer Prize) mentor to Eric Forner (Columbia University historian)

  • Jerome Bruner (American psychologist) mentor to Berry Brazelton (Harvard Medical School pediatrician)

  • Lawrence Cremin (education historian) mentor to Sol Cohen

  • Tom Mabry (plant chemist) mentor to Elroy Rodriguez (plant chemist)

  • Simon Flexner (Rockefeller Institute) mentor to Alex Carrel (1944 Nobel Prize winner for Medicine)

  • Helen Davies (biologist) named in 1998 as the LIfetime Mentor by the American Academy for the Advancement of Science

  • Dr. Benjamin Carson (Johns Hopkins pediatric neurosurgeon Bio) mentored by his mother, Sonya

  • Dr. Patricia Goldman-Rakic (Yale professor of neuroscience, neurology and psychiatry Bio) mentored by Haldor Rosvold (pioneering expert on brain function, Bio)

  • Alexsandr Luria (Russian neurologist), W.H. Auden (1907-1973), and psychologist Jerome Bruner were mentors to Oliver Sacks (neurologist and author, Bio 1933-2015)

  • Dr. Roland Scott (physician) mentor to Angela Ferguson (distinquished African American scientist-physician)

  • Alfred Adler mentor to Viktor Frankl

  • Alan Carr (Sausalito psychologist and brother), John Seward (UCLA professor), Mervin Freedman (San Francisco State University professor), John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., Robert Kennedy, Wayne Dyer mentors to Rey Carr (CEO, Peer Resources)

  • Hugo Munsterberg mentor to Robert Mearns Yerkes (psychologist Bio)

  • Gregory Bateson (social theorist) mentor to his daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson (anthropologist)

  • Dr. Sam Gruber (biologist and shark researcher) mentor to Tim Calver (underwater photographer from Canada)
  • Galen Rowell (National Geographic photographer) mentor to Gordon Wiltsie (high altitude photographer)

  • Kingman Brewster (President of Yale) mentor to Derek Bok (President of Harvard)
  • Robert McNamara (former US Secretary of Defense) mentor to Lee Iacocca (former president of Chrysler)

  • J. Leslie Rollins (president of the Bendix Corporation) mentor to William Agee (former president of the Bendix Corporation)

  • William Agee (former president of the Bendix Corporation) mentor to Mary Cunningham (business executive with Seagrams, Semper Corporation, and Bendix)

  • Walter Shewhart (mathematician) mentor to W. Edwards Deming (business leader and mathematical physicist)

  • Donald Spencer (pioneering US mathematician) mentor to John Nash (Nobel Prize mathematician)

  • Antoni Zygmond (mathematician) mentor to Alberto Calderón (Argentine mathematician)

  • Michael Ronca (high school band director) and Jim Farr (founder of the Center for Creative Leadership) mentors to Roger Herman (management consultant and author of the best-selling book, How to Become an Employer of Choice)

  • Sidney Weinberg mentor to Henry Ford

  • Take a stroll down Mentor Avenue in Painesville, Ohio

  • Dallas Smythe (communications scholar) mentor to Sut Jhally (communications professor, University of Massachusetts)

  • Vernon L. Smith (2002 Nobel Prize winner) mentor to Bart Wilson

  • Mentor is a city in Kentucky (population 169)

  • Earl Nightingale mentor to Jim Cathcart

  • Sir Humphry Davy mentor to Michael Faraday (English physicist and creator of electromagnetism)

  • Gottfried von Leibniz mentor to Sir Isaac Newton

  • Dr. Arthur Walker (Stanford University physics professor) mentor to Sally K. Ride (first woman in space)

  • Neils Bohr mentor Werner Heisenberg

  • Horatio Hale mentor to Franz Boas (anthropologist and designer of phonetic alphabet for Aboriginal languages)

  • Franz Boas mentor to Edward Sapir

  • Alexander von Humboldt (German naturalist) mentor to Max Eisenstein (German mathematician)

  • Christiaan Huygens (17th century astronomer) mentor to Gottfried Leibniz (father of calculus)

  • Hermann von Helmholtz mentor to Max Planck

  • Max Planck and Hans Geiger mentors to Walther Bothe (Nobel Prize winner in physics, 1954)

  • John Stevens Henslow (academic and clergyman Bio) mentor to Charles Darwin (Bio)

  • Charles Darwin (1809-1882) was a mentor to Canadian biologist George John Romanes (1848-1894, Bio).

  • Gerolamo Cardano (Italian mathematician) mentor to Lodovico Ferrari (Italian mathematician and first to find algebraic solution to quartic equation)

  • Leucippus of Miletus (Greek philosopher) mentor to Democritus of Abderra (created the theory of atoms)

  • Wlater Headlam (Greek scholar and classicist) mentor to Dillwyn Knox

  • Otto Stern (1943 Nobel prize in physics) mentor to Isidor Rabi (1944 Nobel prize in physics)

  • Albert Claude (Nobel biologist) mentor to George Palade (Nobel physician) - Details and photos (Requires membership in the Peer Resources Network)

  • George Palade (Nobel physician) mentor to Elizabeth Sztul (biochemist), Gunter Blobel (Nobel biochemist) andAjit Varki (glycobiologist) - Details and photos (Requires membership in the Peer Resources Network)

  • Leonid Isaakovich Mandelshtam (Russian scientist) mentor to Igor Yevgenyevich Tamm (1958 Nobel Laureate in Physics)

  • Francis J. Ryan (Columbia professor) mentor to Joshua Lederberg (1958 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine)

  • Reinhold Neibuhr (described as mentor to the 20th century)

  • Bernard Maybeck (architect) mentor to Julia Morgan (architect)

  • Eva Matsuzaki (architect) mentor to many students of architecture at the University of British Columbia

  • Walter Gropius (Professor, Harvard School of Design) mentor to Cornelia Hahn Oberlander (Canada's foremost landscape architect)

  • Frank Lloyd Wright (architect) mentor to Francis Conroy Sullivan (Canadian architect) and Arthur Erickson (Canadian architect)

  • C.E. Pratt (Canadian architect) mentor to Ron Thom (Canadian architect)

  • William Le Baron Jenney (architect and inventor of the term skyscaper) mentor to Louis Sullivan (father of modern US architecture)

  • Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (architect) mentor to Philip Johnson (dean of American architects) and Phyllis Lambert (founder, Canadian Centre for Architecture)

  • Othmar Ammann (American engineer and designer of the George Washington Bridge) mentor to his rival Gustav Lindenthal (engineer)

  • William Eliot (former president of Harvard) mentor to William Lyon Mackenzie King (former Prime Minister of Canda)

  • Mentor Depret is the full name of a geologist in Belgium

  • Joshua Lederberg (Nobel laureate and genetics resercher) and Gerard Kuiper (astronomer) mentors to Carl Sagan (astrophysicist and writer)

  • Mason Cooley (U.S aphorist) is quoted as saying: "Pedgogical romances leave the mentor disgruntled, the pupil confused."

  • Dr. Helen Singer Kaplan mentor to Dr. Ruth Westheimer (psychologist, sex counselor)

  • Charles Cobb (former director of CORE) mentor to Benjamin Chavis (former director of the NAACP)

  • Thomas Francis (epidemiologist) and Dr. R. Keith Cannon (professor of chemistry) mentors to Jonas Salk (physician and discovered polio vaccine while becoming independent of his mentor)

  • Paul Bartlett (Harvard chemistry professor) mentor to Bojas Jennings (chemist)

  • Norman Zinberg (psychoanalyst) mentor to Andrew Weil (health physician)

  • K.O. Emery (Princeton professor) mentor to Robert Ballard (explorer and discoverer of the Titanic)

  • Robert Scott (Antarctic explorer) mentor to Apsley Cherry-Garrard (Antarctic explorer, memoirist, and author of The Worst Journey in the World)

  • James Neel (geneticist) mentor to Napoleon Chagnon (anthropologist)

  • Richard Shultes (ethnobotanist and Harvard educator) (1915-2001) mentor to Canadian Wade Davis (anthropologist and ethnobotanist)

  • Virtual Mentor is the name of the ethics journal of the American Medical Association

  • Dr. Francis S. Collins (Director, Human Genome Project) was mentored by a Yale Professor

  • Dr. Alton Ochsner mentor to Dr. Denton A. Cooley (surgeon)

  • Xiao Gong, MD, TCMD and Edith Davis are mentors to Andy Lininger, licensed acupuncturist (Bio)

  • James Durham (former dean of Temple University) mentor to Robert K. Merton (sociologist, writer)

  • Benjamin E. Mays (former president of Morehouse College) mentor to David Satcher (physician and Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

  • Mentor Engineering is a company in Calgary, Alberta

  • Dr. W. Norman Scott mentor to Dr. Robert S. Gotlin (NBC sports medicine consultant)

  • Thomas Sowell (economist) mentor to Clarence Thomas (US Supreme Court justice)

  • Klaus Kleinfeld (CEO, Siemens) mentored by Georg Brandl who told him, "Keenly visualize the future."

  • John R. Commons (economist) mentor to Selig Perlman (economist)

  • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (former US Supreme Court justice) mentor to Alger Hiss (lawyer, peace activist)

  • Lloyd Constantine (lawyer) mentor to Eliot Spitzer (former governor of New York and lawyer)

  • Donald Kendall (former CEO of PepsiCo) mentor to John Scully (former CEO of Apple)

  • Harland Sanders (the Colonel) mentor to Dave Thomas (founder of Wendy's)

  • Visit the village of Mentor in northwest Minnesota to see the maple leaves turn colors

  • John Rowe Workman (Brown University classics professor) mentor to Ted Turner

  • Brian Roberts (CEO, Comcast) was mentored by his father, Ralph Roberts, who told him, "Let others take the credit."

  • Bob Glavin (CEO, Motorola) was a mentor to Hector Ruiz (CEO of AMD) and told him, "Surround yourself with people of integrity, and get out of their way."

  • Larry Ellison (CEO, Oracle) and Alan Hassenfeld (CEO, Hasbro) were mentors to Marc Benioff (founder and CEO of Salesforce.com). Alan told him, "Incorporate philanthropy into your corporate structure."

  • Conrad Black (businessman) mentored by his father, George (businessman)

  • The National Attention Deficit Disorder Association is located in Mentor, Ohio

  • Mentor Township (population 1098) is in the state of Michigan

  • Everett Blackwood (President, City Tire and Auto Centre, Ltd) mentor to Rodney England (Guardian Security and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Nicolle Morrison (Co-Owner, Century 21 Northumberland) mentor to (David M. Collins and Carnah Collins, Atlantis Health Spa and winners, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Marc Lefrançois (President, Via Rail Canada) mentor to Jeffrey Campbell (Core Networks, Inc. and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Donald Whitty (President and CEO, Mosaic Technologies Corporation) mentor to Philip Colton (Canos Consultants and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Henri-Paul Rosseau (President, Laurentian Bank of Canada) mentor to isabel Rodriquez and Yves Besner (i4design and winners, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Luc Filiatrault (President, BellZinc) mentor to Ryan Kalt (NuMedia Internet, Inc. and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Roselyn Nugent (President, Bayridge Lumber and Forest Products) mentor to Jonathan Strauss (Strauss Communications and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Ron Waldman (President, Great Western Brewing) mentor to Ben Voss (B.D.I./Clear -Green Biotechnologies and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • J. Richard Frey (President, Atco Electric) mentor to Marcos Lopez and Douglas Robertson (Bitonic Solutions, Inc. and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • André Ouellet (President, Canada Post) mentor to Mark Whalen (Urban Organics and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Mentor-on-the-Lake is a city in Northeast Ohio

  • Ken Toner (President and CEO, Atuqtuarviq Corporation) mentor to Tracy Wallace (Natsiq Productions and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Fred Hunt (President and CEO, Nunasi Corporation) mentor to Hau Thanh Huynh (Arctic Jewellers and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Janet Wood (CMA, Abacus Accounting) mentor to Melanie Graham (Kutters Hairstyling and winner, Young Entrepreneur Award)

  • Joe Choti (CTO, MLB.com) mentored by his father

  • Bob Moffatt (Leader personal computer division of IBM) mentored up by Inhi Cho (IBM mid-level manager)

  • Pat Connolly (Williams-Sonoma) mentor to Hilary Billings (creator of web catalogues for Pottery Barn, RedEnvelope, Starwood)

  • Canadian plasma physicist Tudor Johnston (1932-2016) is a mentor to scientist Federico Rosei.

  • Food expert Dorothy Cann Hamilton (1949-2016) founded The French Culinary Institute and mentored many famous chefs.

  • Canadian Gold Medal architect and urban planner Arthur Erickson (1924-2009) was a mentor to Canadian architect and urban designer Bing Thom (1940-2016).

  • Former Fox president and founder of Jackal production company Gail Berman is a mentor to actress Laverne Cox.

    font face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans serif" size="4"> American teacher Peggy Brookins, the president and CEO of National Board for Professional Teaching Standards calls her ninth grade teacher, Ms. Mason, her mentor.

  • When Canadian physician David Sackett (1936-2016) was in his last year of medical school and asked to provide treatment for various maladies of people entrusted to his care, he began to wonder about the evidence for the validity of such standard treatments that were long rooted in tradition and expert opinion. His questioning and curiosity led him to earn the title of “Father of Evidence- Based Medicine,.” He was the first person to conduct clinical trials examining the value of aspirin in preventing heart attacks and strokes; an approach started a movement that continues to gain momentum today in a broad spectrum from pediatrics to geriatrics. His approach has now become standard practice not only in medicine but has emerged as a trend in coaching and mentoring. Dr. Sackett was a strong advocate for mentoring as one of the determinants of academic success as a clinician and scientist. He based his conclusions on his observations of the more than 300 young academics he mentored in the USA, Canada, and the U.K. One of the many he mentored said, "He showed us the importance of mentorship across disciplines. When I was in medical school, and he was at the pinnacle of his fame, he took on a group of us for an elective. I often think about this when I am trying to find time to give young physicians."

  • Marnie Rice (1949-2016) was a mental health professional who began her career engaging in behaviour modification of inmates in one of Canada's most notorious mental institutions that was known for its concrete cells and steel bars. It housed most dangerous psychopaths, serial murderers and pedophiles in Canada. Eventually she became the Director of Research and was determined to find ways to assess the risk of violence in her patients and devise practical treatments. It was a daunting task for her to remain positive given the violence demonstrated by her charges. At one point she was attacked by a psychotic patient during a group session. She said, "He grabbed me around the neck and tried to strangle me, but he was pretty weak. Everybody jumped up to help. It was nothing serious." Dr. Rice used her experience to develop a tool to solve this problem of attacks on staff. She learned that assaults on staff were often prompted by staff members' attitudes toward their patients. She developed a guide to train staff members that was used by many other institutions. She eventually developed another tool to assess the risk of releasing psychopaths back into the community. Everyone who worked with her knew of her passion for mentoring new scientists. "She kept her door open and was happy to answer questions and give encouragement. Her nurturing prompted us to have high standards for scientific research and ethics," said one of those she mentored.

  • Canadian Purdy Crawford (1932-2014) was a lawyer and executive who didn’t think of himself as a mentor. Mr. Crawford, a Canadian legal expert and business executive, left a legacy of many people he mentored. One of those he mentored became the first woman to serve as a justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. At a time when women were struggling to gain access to the old boy's club of legal firms in Toronto, Purdy Crawford hired her to work with him, and acted as an advocate or sponsor for her early career advancement. Gordon Pitts, who wrote a book about Mr. Crawford said that Crawford's "greatest contribution to Canada was serving as a personal mentor for generations of young people who now form a who’s who of Canada’s most influential leaders," including Canada’s Governor General David Johnston, and the CEO’s of some of Canada’s major corporations. Mr. Crawford’s obituary in the August 16 issue of the Globe and Mail newspaper reported that "Deborah Alexander, executive vice-president and general counsel at Bank of Nova Scotia said Mr. Crawford was her most important mentor as a young lawyer, and that much of her personal success is attributable to him."

  • Hunter Harrison, CEO of Canadian Pacific Railway, Ltd., is a mentor to Keith Creel, President and COO of Canadian Pacific Railway.

  • Gordon Matheson, team doctor for the Golden State Warriors, professor emeritus at the Stanford University School of Medicine, former director of sports medicine at Stanford University and chairman of the board of directors for Calgary-based WorldPlay, a disruptive online-video platform provider
  • Saskatoon-born Canadian businessperson, billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist Jimmy Pattison is a mentor to former radio announcer and retired Chairman of the Jimmy Pattison Broadcast Group (JPBG), Rick Arnish.

  • Palo Alto, California-born Canadian clinical psychologist Vincent Caccamo (1942-2017), who worked especially with veterans and received a commendation for his work with soldiers with PTSD, was described as "a respected colleague and mentor."
  • Canadian entrepreneur, engineer, and businessperson with an MBA from Harvard University, David George Fraser (?-2017) was described as "an inspirational mentor to many and a leader in business, community and charitable organizations."
  • Victoria, British Columbia raised Canadian conservationist, biologist who specialized in the study of sea birds, Harry Carter (1956-2017) was described as a "natural collaborator and most generous mentor to many."
  • Historian and award-winning author Michael Bliss (1941-2017) professor of history at the University of Toronto, recipient of the Order of Canada and member of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame is a mentor to McGill University history professor Elspeth Heaman.

  • John Porter (1921-1979), known as Canada's most distinguished sociologist of his time, mentored whole generations of sociologists, particularly those enrolled at Carleton University where he taught for 30 years. He pioneered the view that contradicted the popular opinion at the time that Canada was a democratic "classless society" in his award-winning book and controversial book, The Vertical Mosaic (1965). Instead, Dr. Porter emphasized the relationship between class structure and power.

  • American Nobel Prize winning chemist, peace activist, author and educator Linus Pauling (190101994) is a mentor to British pioneer in new approaches to health and nutrition, author and health scientist Patrick Holford, a member of the Orthomolecular Medicine Hall of Fame.

  • American physicist Joseph Henry (1797-1878), the first secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, an inventor of the first telegraph, and a pioneer in weather observation which led to the creation of the U.S.Weather Bureau, was a mentor to Scotland-born Canadian, American inventor, scientist, and engineer, credited with producing the first practical telephone Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), who learned the Mohawk language and was awarded the title Honorary Chief.

  • Alberta businessperson, founder of Atco Ltd and the founder of Spruce Meadows equestrian centre, Ron Southern (1930-2016) is called a mentor by his daughter Alberta-born Nancy Southern, award-winning business executive. She said of her father, "He didn't always agree with me; we weren't always the best of friends. But he always had my back, and I always had his. I don't think I would have ever been ready for the job had he not started preparing me when we lived back at the trailer factory site when we first started. I will be forever thankful to him for that. I feel lonely without him, but I don't feel lost."

  • Canada's CFO of the year for 2017 business executive Michael Rousseau indicates his mentors included Norm Latowsky, the CEO of United Cigar Stores who taught him professionalism, good listening skills and the role of business leadership; business executive Robert MacLellan who taught him the importance of focus, being direct, and being decision-oriented; and business executive Calin Rovinescu, who helped him learn about passion, strategic intensity, flexibility and courage.

  • Canadian music teacher George McRae was a mentor to Estonia-born Canadian violinist, trombonist and music teacher Mati Sulev (1941-2017).

  • Canadian-born Maurice Strong (1929-2015) is a mentor to businessperson, Founder and Chairman Emeritus of Barrick Gold Corporation Peter Munk, who, in turn, is a mentor to business executives Jamie Sokalsky and Randall Oliphant, and helped establish the cardiac mentor program at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre.

  • Canadian philanthropist, athlete, mentor and thoracic surgeon, Bill Nelems (1939-2017), who participated in the world’s first lung transplant and the use of a blood test to detect changes related to lung cancer, established The Okanagan-Zambia Health Initiative to bring Canadian medical professionals to Zambia to act as mentors to their Zambian peers and improve the quality of medical care.

  • Considered the father of French cuisine, Paul Bocuse is a mentor to American chef Thomas Keller.

  • British performance coaching founder Sir John Whitmore (1937-2017) was a mentor to dozens of coaches through his creation of the GROW model of coaching and considered American actor Steve McQueen (1930-1980) one of his mentors.

  • Brandeis University music scholar is a mentor to music scholar, writer and lecturer Michael Marissen.

  • Estonian-born American neuroscientist and psychobiologist Jaak Panksepp (1943-2017) was described as a "generous and wise mentor to more junior scientists, the kind of person you wanted to meet in conferences and get his perspective on your life as much as you wanted to tell him about your science. The kind of person who cared and wanted to save you the fear of science."
  • Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), one of the most well-known US architects, was mentored by Louis Sullivan (1856-1924), also an architect and the first person to hire Wright. His firm, Adler and Sullivan was the leading edge of American architecture and skyscraper design. Sullivan created the idea of blending nature with the world of science and technology. He was particularly adept at blending ornamentation and building design rather than ornamentation as an add on to the design. His buildings inspired a generation of American and European architects.

  • Movie marketing innovator and former chair of the National Research Group, Joseph Farrell (1935-2011) was a mentor to "JC."

  • A leader in the field of comparative education and alternative schools, the University of Toronto's Joe Farrell (1939-2012) served as a mentor to scores of fellow instructors and researchers, as well as students..

  • Tech journalist Walt Mosberg is a mentor to NY Times technology reporter Mike Isaac.

  • American investor Eugene Lang (1919-2017), awarded the US Presidential Medal of Freedom and the man who created the I Have a Dream Foundation, which included a year-round program of academic support with a mentor for each student, was responsible for the success of hundreds of at-risk youth. In giving over $150 million dollars to the foundation, Mr. Lang said, "Giving should not be mechanical. It should be the fruit of one's feeling, love and sense of responsibility. Giving is not giving back. There is no quid pro quo. Giving is self-fulfillment."

  • Stewart, British Columbia-born Donald McLeod (1928-2017), an award-winning member of Canada's Mining Hall of Fame, was described as "an inspirational role model and mentor for many young people."

  • American artist, architect, poet, puppeteer, and inventor Roger Hayward (1899-1979) was a talented who is primarily remembered today for his distinct and prolific work as a scientific illustrator, collaborating for many years with American Nobel scientist Linus Pauling and Scientific American magazine, among others. Hayward was also an expert on optics who played an important role in the development of the Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. Along with a colleague at Caltech he mentored, John Strong, they invented the projection screen used in motion picture studios.

  • An early advocate of preventive medicine, Vancouver, British Columbia-born Canadian medical doctor Roger Hayward Rogers (1928-2011) who emphasized the importance of exercise and vegetables in the diet and was considered a revolutionary because of his interest in health rather than disease and after whom the $250,000 Dr. Rogers Prize in complementary medicine is named, is a mentor to Canadian doctor R. Winona Rowat.

  • Saskatchewan-born Canadian biochemist, physician and psychiatrist Abram Hoffer (1917-2009) was known for his work on the origins of schizophrenia and the use of megavitamin therapy (particularly niacin) to treat mental illness (a practice that was not accepted by the medical community) is a mentor to naturopathic doctor Greg Tefft. Dr. Hoffer told Dr. Tefft, "I moved back to Canada from the U.S. because I used to treat schizophrenia without drugs and they hated me there. They wanted me to use drugs. So I ended up retiring in Canada. The heck with the place! They just want to drug you up."

  • Minnesota-born, military veteran, science researcher and university professor David B. Anderson was mentored by members of the American Meat Science Association (AMSA) and became the president of the association. After retirement Dr. Anderson created the AMSA Educational Foundation Mentor Recognition Program. Each recipient receives a custom-made sculpture created by Dr. Anderson.

  • American psychology professor and author who specializes in the psychological trait of mindset Carol Dweck is a mentor to American psychologist and author Heidi Grant Halvorson.

  • New York-born Award-winning Canadian vision research scientist, experimental psychologist and university professor Martin Steinbach (1941-2017), who worked tirelessly as an advocate for collaboration between clinicians and basic scientists, was noted as not only a productive scientist but also a generous mentor.

  • Vancouver-born Canadian teacher, school administrator and school principal Lori Burley (1956-2017) was known as "a respected administrator whose leadership united the many colleagues with whom she worked and inspired the countless young educators whom she mentored."

  • Nuremberg, Germany-born Canadian university geography emeritus professor Gunter Gad (1939-2017) was a mentor to many students.

  • Canadian business leader and president and CEO of one of Canada's largest payment processors, Angela Brown says, "I've been very fortunate to have had some wonderful mentors through my whole career. Today, I still have mentors that reach out to when I'm dealing with something and Ineed some different prespectives. I mentor a few people today, formally and informally. It's a great opportunity to share a few pearls of what these younger people could be thinking about as they pursue their own careers."

  • Canadian business executive Thomas Schwartz (1948-2017) was described as a "mentor to many," including David Erlich, CEO of Irish Residential Properties REIT and Trish MacPherson, Canadian business executive.

  • Canadian past president of the Royal College of Dentists, Richard Emery (1952-2017) "trained many over the years who now form the fabric of oral maxillo-facial surgery in Canada and abroad." He was a "teacher, healer, athlete, mentor and loyal friend."

  • Sasktatchewan-born Canadian surgeon Dr. Thirza Smith (1949-2017) was described as "a teacher and mentor to young doctors and travelled to Indonesia to offer advice on maternal health." She served as president of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada from 2000-2001.

  • Canadian teacher Tammy Chen, who died in a terrorist attack at a cafe in Burkina Faso August 13, 2017 was described as a mentor who taught her students "valuable lessons that cannot be taught through textbooks or videos. Mrs. Chen taught us to care about others, care about ourselves and find a passion for learning."

  • Egyptian-born Canadian engineer and business executive Samir Zalzal (1932-2017) was described as a mentor.

  • Canadian physician, feminist psychiatrist and Canada's first corporate psychiatrist Mary McEwan () was a mentor to artists Helen Lucas and Joyce Wieland (1930-1998); journalists Judy Steed and Olivia Ward; Toronto Starrcolumnist Doris Anderson; the coordinator of York University's Women's Studies Program, Shelagh Wilkinson; and corporate executive Bonnie Fowke.

  • Hong Kong-born Canadian psychologist, educator, university professor and social-emotional needs of children advocate Anita King Fun Li (1930-2017) was described as a mentor, confidante, role model and inspiration to many.

  • Toronto, Ontario-born former Justice of the Federal Court of Appeal, distinguished law professor and Officer of the Order of Canada Allen Martin Linden (1934-2017) was described as a friend, teacher, mentor and example to many.

  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan-born teacher, artist and formerly Teacher of the Year Matina Chrones (1932-2017) was noted for the time she spent after retirement encouraging and mentoring many of her students who remained an integral part of her post-teaching life.

  • British Columbia-born Canadian scientist, leader and adventurer Richard Stace-Smith (1924-2017), who specialized in protecting the biodiversity and the environment by researching how viruses affected food crops, was described as a "mentor and servant to his community."

  • Award-winning Canadian pilot, lawyer, aviation executive, member of the Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame storyteller and family man Victor R. Bennett (1928-2017) was a co-founder of Retired Entrepreneurs Living in Kingston (RELIK), a volunteer group dedicated to mentoring young entrepreneurs in the Kingston (Ontario) area.

  • Montreal, Quebe-born Canadian philanthropist, business executive, real estate developer, storyteller, creator of the "Giller Prize" for literature and member of the Order of Canada Jack Rabinovitch (1930-2017)?
  • Winnipeg, Manitoba-born Canadian defence lawyer Hersh Wolch (1940-2017), who specialized in overturning wrongful convictions, was described as a mentor by Greg Rodin, who eventually became a partner in Mr. Wolch's law firm. As reported in the Globe and Mail, Mr. Rodin said that among the many things he learned "from his mentor was the very basic rule of practice...if you focus on the client then everything else will follow."

  • American-born Canadian energy executive, often referred to as the "icon of the Canadian oilpatch," and member of the Order of Canada Rick George (1950-2017) is a mentor to Canadian energy executive Steve Spence.

  • India-born Canadian accountant John Craig (1940-2016) was described as a mentor who "always remembered the kindness of strangers upon his arrival in Canada and in turn helped many young people achieve success..."

  • Alberta-born Canadian businessman, equestrian advocate, member of the Order of Canada, and member of the Canadian Business Hall of Fame and Canada's Sports Hall of Fame Ron Southern (1930-2016) is a mentor to Canadian businessman George Brookman, who said of his mentor, "Whenever I have had any issues, I think to myself, 'How would Ron Southern handle this?'"

  • University professor and administrator Aaronette White (-2012) is a mentor to scholar Robert Majzler. In an article about his mentor that appeared in the university newspaper, he said, "I owe much to her. I was a proto-feminist before I met her but she totally expanded my notion of what is possible and who can be a feminist. (Her death) is bittersweet. I just know she's here with me. I'm carrying her picture. Her legacy continues with us, her students." When Dr. White died, Mr. Majzler was so distraught, the article went on to say, he considered discontinuing his studies. But then Dr. White's mother reached out. "She sent me a card saying, 'Rob, you meant a lot to Aaronette. You honor her by continuing the work you did together."

  • New Jersey-born key figure in the development of adventure education and experiential learning and author of more than 22 books on the subject Karl Rohnke is a mentor to Kansas-born founder of the experiential education training company, Big Wheels, author, leadership trainer, and international speaker Michelle Cummings.

  • Mechanical engineering professor Alice Agogino received the Lifetime Mentor Award from the American Association for teh Advancement of Science in 2013 for her mentoring of more than 50 graduate students and an estimated 800 undergraduate researchers, many of them underrepresented minorities.

  • American English professor at the University of California at Berkeley Paul Alpers (1932-2013) is a mentor to Tony Cascardi, Dean of Arts and Humanities at the University of California at Berkeley.

  • American crossword puzzle expert Jeff Chen is a mentor to crossword puzzle designer and author of How to Get Started Solving The New York Times Crossword Michelle Kenney.

  • Connecticutt-born American astronaut, microbiologist, scientist and the first person to sequence DNA in space Kate Rubins, the 60th woman to fly in space, was mentored by David Relman, an infectious disease professor at Stanford University. Dr. Rubin said, "When I was a kid, I really wanted to be an astronaut, a biologist, and a geologist...simultaneously." She added, "People actually do this as a career. An astronaut is a real job, not just something you say when you're a kid."

  • University of Pittsburgh microbiologist Roger Hendrix (1943-2017) was a mentor Gary Sarkis, American scientist and product development executive.

  • Toronto-based Canadian entrepreneur, professor and public servant James Fleck, known for his mentorship, was elevated to be a Companion of the Order of Canada.

  • Award-winning Professor Dominque Weis, director of the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research (PCIGR) at the University of British Columbia, and the Canada Research Chair in the Geochemistry of the Earth's Mantle, "works hard to mentor and encourage more students, particularly young women, to enter STEAM career path and make a difference in the world of science."

  • History teacher, founder of an alternative school program and school administrator Canadian John Gillett (1924-2017) was described as a mentor to students and teachers.

  • Vice-president of strategic initiatives at Lockheed Martin Canada, Lorraine Ben is a strong advocate for mentoring as a key aspect of the company's efforts to promote STEM learning. "We employe hundreds of STEM professionals who are committed to giving back, volunteering, mentoring and sharing their own personal stories of success. I have personally benefited from mentorship. I have had several mentors over the years, both men and women, who showed me what great leadership looks like. They taught me the compassion and passion are qualities in great leaders, and their guidance gave me the strength to look within myself and focus on my strong points. That's the real value of mentorship, and it's what we want to pass on to young people interested in STEM careers."

  • Canadian aboriginal and community leader Jim Sinclair (1933-2012) was a mentor to Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak.

  • South African-born Canadian journalist, author and journalism teacher Michael Cobden (1940-2017) was described as an "encouraging mentor."

  • Winnipeg, Manitoba-born engineering professor, former soldier and great grandfather George Soulis (1925-2018) was known as "a popular teacher and mentor for undergraduate and graduate students as well as to his many friends and colleagues."

  • Award-winning former CEO of a major Canadian TV network, television business executive and member of the Order of Canada Jacob "Jay" Switzer (1956-2018) was recognized by his peers for "mentoring emergent talent—both individuals and organizations" in the Canadian broadcasting industry. He was described as a mentor to "countless independent producers and creators of Canadian works for the screen."

  • South African-born Canadian businesswoman, investor, author, television personality entrepreneur Arlene Dickinson is a mentor to Canadian entrepreneur and founder of Healthy Pets, Emma Harris.

  • Nelson, British Columbia-born Canadian economist and dedicated public servant, Ian Bennett (1948-2018) was known as a mentor others turned to for advice while fostering their talents through honesty and integrity.

  • Fromer Canadian chief executive officer of Shaw Communications and philanthropist, Jim Shaw (1957-2017) was described by his younger brother, Brad, the current CEO of Shaw Communications, as a mentor. He said, "Our lives will not be as complete without hearing Jim's laughter or getting the benefit of his counsel or his insight."

  • Former president and CEO of the Canadian Youth Business Foundation (now Futurepreneur), small business strategist, and award-winning leader and fundraiser Vivian Prokop Mirchandani (1959-2017) was described as a "generous mentor to dozens and indirectly to thousands more through her mentorship of mentors."

  • Innovative pediatric physician who improved the survival and health of premature babies Jerold Lucey (1926-2017) was known as a "generous mentor." One of his colleagues said, "Here you had this international champion for infants and children and yet when you called him, he answered the phone himself, his door was always open, and he loved to sit down and talk to anyone about anything." He also would do the same for strangers, according to caolleague Dr. Marshall Land, who related this story about Dr. Lucey: "Ten years ago Dr. Lucey tumbled down an escalator at JFK Airport. Waiting for hours in an emergency room with a skull fracture and a dislocated shoulder, he noticed that other patients, many with gunshot injuries, were confused about their medical care. He crawled off his gurney, with spinal fluid leaking out of his nose and he went around to each patient, looked at their chart and explained what was going on with them."

  • Ohio-born Old Testament scholar and biblical archaelogist Professor G. Ernest Wright (1909-1974) was a mentor to Ohio-born archaelology professor who unearthed evidence in the Eastern Mediterranean about the bible, Lawrence Stager (1943-2017).

  • Dover, England-born award-winning astronomy pioneer and a giant among astrophysicists Donald Lynden Bell (1935-2018) is a mentor to India-born astronomer and astrophysicist Somak Raychaudhury.

  • Dr. Margaret Smith was a mentor to Manhattan-born pediatric neurologist and university teacher Dr. Arnold Gold (1925-2018). Dr. Gold believed strongly in the importance of empathy as a key element of bedside manner and co-founded a foundation to inspire young doctors to practice compassionate care.

  • Award-winning American landscape designer Raymond Jungles was a mentor to Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx (1909-1994).

  • Award-winning, Illinois-born certified creativity coach, speaker, author and President and CEO of The Creativity Coaching Association Beverly Down (1952-2017) was known as a mentor to many.

    dave

  • Business executive and former CEO of Twitter Anthony Noto is a mentor to Twitter chief executive Jack Dorsey.

  • American marine biologist Sylvia Earle is a mentor environmental activist and visual artist Dianna Cohen, who says of her mentor, "I've learned a lot of great lessons from her. When Sylvia wants to bring people into what she's talking about—it doesn't matter is she's giving a speech to a room of 10 people or a room of thousands—she brings her voice down, soft and deep, and draws you in. It's very powerful, intimate, and commanding—much more so than raising one's voice."

  • Swedish-born founder of IKEA (at age 17), philanthropist, author and entrepreneur Ingvar Kamprad (1926-2018) is a mentor to former president of IKEA Anders Moberg.

  • German-born American pioneering medical genetics speciallist and a refugee from Nazi Germany Arno Motulsky (1923-2018) was "considered a talented teacher and mentor by colleagues and students." One of his students said of him, "He gave me the confidence ot design a large study on lipid levels in survivors of heart attacks and gave me support and resources—at a time when I was only 28 years old."

  • One of the most eminent psychologists of the 20th century whose research focused on cooperation, conflict resolution and social justice, award-winning American Morton Deutsch (1920-2017) was known as a 'remarkably warn, wise and respectful mentor."

  • Evaluation specialist, author, creator of the Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation (JCSEE) and probably the greatest worldwide influence on the field of evaluation Daniel Sutfflebeam (1936-2017) is a mentor to emeritus researcher and professor emeritus of counselor education and counseling psycholog Arlen Gullickson.

  • Nobel Prize Romanian-born American professor and winner for the use of electron microscopes George E. Palade (1912-2008) was a mentor to Nobel Laureate, university professor and molecular biologist that discovered that proteins in any living cell have codes Günter Blobel (-2018).

  • Transgender neuroscientist Ben Barres (1954-2017), who published more than 167 peer-reviewed papers, sparked the effort on understanding glial cells, which are the most abundant type of cells in the central nervous system, closely examined many diseases that impacted the brain and was well-known for being an advocate of marginalized communities, including women in academia, was described as "a beloved mentor to students and trainees."

  • Former governor of Arizona and lawyer Janet Napolitano is a mentor to former White House lawyer, former CEO of Girl Scouts and now chief strategy officer of the National Council on Aging, Anna Maria Chavez, who said of her mentor, "She mentored me on issues that I didn't have experience in. She trusted me to ask the right questions, to come to her, and to ensure that my political instincts were on target. She allowed me to advise her on housing issues and Latino affairs. Because of that experience, I was able to move on and be a CEO."

  • Active researcher and chemistry professor, Ontario-born Dr. John Goddard (1954-2017) was "an accomplished teacher and mentor for both undergraduate and graduate students" at the University of Guelph.

  • Egypt-born Canadian university professor, photographer and formerly co-director of the Vanier Institute, Alan Mirabelli (1948-2017) was described as "a mentor to many and to the end of his last chapter he continued to meet with budding artists, young people and children guiding them to become the best of themselves in their creative pursuits."

  • Calgary-born lawyer and soldier John Clarry (1919-2018) was described as a "progressive person who provided thoughtful insights to clients and numerous Boards on which he served, as well as being a mentor to younger lawyers."

  • Toronto-born Canadian surgeon William Macrae (1940-2017) "recognized the importance of mentorship...and believed in letting a student take charge of a case, allow(ing) them to make a mistake and then help them fix it. He created a culture of respect, of mentorship and trust. His students have often remarked that whenever they operate, they consider, 'What would Bill do here?' The concept of paying it forward was instilled in every resident Bill taught."

  • Chinese human rights activist and dissident Harry Wu (1937-2016) was a mentor to American journalist Anthony LoBaido.

  • Canadian mining legend Donald McLeod (1928-2017), who grew up in Stewart, British Columbia, was considered a mentor by his children who followed him into the mining business.

  • Montreal-born Canadian businesswoman Gertrude Kerbel (1923-2017) was known as "a top producer and mentor for close to 30 years."

  • Ontario-born Canadian paddler, putterer and cook Jean Stinson (1922-2017) was described as a mentor in the "Lives Lived" column of the Globe and Mail newspaper.

  • Canadian pediatric physician and professor Bill Wilson (1931-2017) was described as having mentored dozens of pediatricians "with a kind, gentle and steady manner.

  • Canadian inspirational guide and strategic coach Daniel Yolleck (1950-2017) was a mentor to senior executives of many of the largest companies in the world. His obituary described as a person who "taught people who to ask questions of themselves and others. He listened in a way that made people feel heard. He spoke in a way that challenged people to be better, professionally and personally."

  • Squamish, British Columbia-based Carbon Engineering CEO Adrian Corless is a mentor to Geoffrey Holmes, director of development at Carbon Engineering. Mr. Holmes says of his mentor, "We have worked toegether since he took over leadership of the company in Fall 2013. He's tireless, positive and innovative. I've learned a ton under his guidance.

  • Award-winning, New York-born American astrophysicist and writer Carl Sagan (1934-1996) is a mentor to award-winning New York-born American astrophysicist, author and spiritual activist Neil deGrasse Tyson.

  • New Jersey-born educator, author, and a key figure in the development of adventure education Karl Rohnke is a mentor to experiential education entrepreneur and award-winning educator Michelle Cummings.

  • Chicago-born American futuristic architect and executive William Pereira (1909-1985), the builder of the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco, was a mentor to Chinese-American bomber pilot and architect Gin Wong (1922-2017), the designer of the Los Angeles International Airport and other modernist structures.

  • Swiss-born American psychiatrist, most known for her work on death, loss and grieving Elisabeth Kübler-Ross (1926-2004) is a mentor to grief and loss counselor and writer David Kessler.

  • Nobel prize in economics winner Richard Thaler is a mentor to New York-born NY Times journalist David Leonhardt.

  • New York-born American lawyer, civil servant, former director of the FBI and special counsel Robert Mueller is a mentor to Princeton University graduate, American attorney and chief of the criminal fraud division of the U.S. Department of Justice Andrew Weissmann.

  • New York City-born Pulitizer Prize winner, American psychiatrist, parapsychologist, writer and professor at Harvard Medical School, John E. Mack (1929-2004), is a mentor to emotional intelligence expert, author, and participant in PEER (Program for Extraordinary Experience Research) Susan Manewich.

  • Boston-born former New York City police commissioner and businessman William J. Bratton is a mentor to New York City police commissioner James P. O'Neill.

  • Germany-born American health care policy expert and analyst and member of the advisory board of the National Institute for Health Care management, who received an undergraduate degree from the University of Saskatchewan and a doctorate from Yale University Uwe Reinhardt (1937-2017) was a mentor to president and CEO of the National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation Nancy Chockley who said, "He was a generous mentor who offered gentle guidance ot countless health care leaders, including me, and always with a genuine modesty about his role."

  • Award-wining and pioneering California-born neuroscientist and anatomical and behavioral researcher and author Marian Diamond (1926-2017), whose lectures while on the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley were constantly attended by a packed audience of science and non-science students where she demonstrated that the brain can continue to develop at any age and emphasized the "neuroplasticity" of the brain and the importance of growth and learning throughout life was a mentor to thousands of students. Neuroscientist and author Wendy Suzuki, a TEDx talk provider, said of her mentor, "The day that I first heard Dr. Diamond unveil her ideas about the brain was the day I wanted to become a neuroscientist." Dr. Diamond was the first scientist to prove that environmental enrichment influenced the brain's learning capacity. Her research led to the founding of the Anatomy Enrichment Program which functioned for more than 30 years as an outreach program for elementary school children in the Berkeley area. She was also the person most associated with studying part of Albert Einstein's brain and identifying what made his brain significantly different from an average brain.

  • Siemens Canada Dual Education Program, led by the Head of Seimens Canada Engineering & Technology Academy, Thamir Murad, provides a structured mentoring program along with hands-on work experience for new recruits.

  • Canadian professional engineer Endre (Andrew) Bakos, project manager for Toronto Transit Commission mentors young engineeers, particularly newcomes to Canada.

  • Saskatchewan-born Canadian carpenter, raconteur and soldier Michael Danyliuk (1922-2017) was described as a mentor by one of his sons who learned diligence, integrity, service to others, service to God as well as the virtues of discipline and work and the value of humour and compassion. He also learned what it meant to be a man.

  • Canadian public servant Ann Borooah (1954-2017), who devoted her life to public service, was considered "a leader in her field (urban planning), a consummate and down to earth professional, and an enthusiastic mentor."
  • British-born Canadian financial industry businessman Christopher Tidd (1942-2017) was described as a person whom countless colleagues and clients benfitted from because of his wisdom, mentorship, kind nature and generosity of spirit.

  • Lawyer and stepfather John Graham was a mentor to Toronto-born Canadian entrepreneur, businessman, officer of the Order of Canada and philanthropist Ted Rogers (1933-2008), who, in turn, was a mentor to Toronto-born Canadian political leader John Tory. A Junior Fellowship Program at the Ted Rogers Leadership Centre provides an executive mentor to each Junior Fellow.

  • High school band teacher Rick Lingard is a mentor to Castlegar, British Columbia-born Canadian singer-songwriter Shawn Hook.

  • Canadian lawyer who specialized in tax and corporate law and was instrumental in establishing the first Canada-wide law firm Jacques Tétrault (1928-2017) was considered a mentor to staff and law firm mentors in Quebec and beyond and was a "fair and principled leader who was among the first to champion the rights of women partners and promote diversity and work-life balance."

  • Canadian high school teacher and car enthusiast John McCulloch (1948-2017) was described as "an educator and life-long learner, dedicated teacher, coach and mentor."

  • Canadian marine biologist, researcher and university professor John Bradley (JB) Lewis (1925-2017) was a scientist, teacher and mentor and "guided many undergraduates and graduate students in the joys of researching the complexities of marine life."

  • Canadian insurance executive Fordham Robert Blow (1947-2017) "served as a mentor for many colleagues and will be remembered for his contribution to the insurance claims management industry."

  • Award-winning Iowa-born legendary, worldwide influence in the field of evaluation, author of more than 19 books and numerous journal articles and grandfather Daniel L. Stufflebeam (1936-2017) was a mentor to Emeritus researcher and professor emeritus of counselor education and coaching psychology at Western Michigan University Arlen R. Gullickson.

  • As Canada geared up for World War II, the government encouraged women to consider factory work. Veronica Foster (1922-2000), become famous across the country as "Ronnie the Bren Gun girl." She would come to represent and serve as an inspiration for more than 1 million Canadian women who worked in manufacturing plants producing materials for WWII. As artist Andrew Hutchison noted: "Women readily took over these empty posts in almost every capacity – heavy equipment operators, scientists, loggers, shipyard workers, munitions manufactures – nearly any and all positions. Canadian women, for the first time, enjoyed the freedom and experience of working out of the home and of gaining their own paycheque." Later, the United States would create a similar factory girl, also wearing a kerchief and rolled up sleeves. But Rosie the Riveter was fiction. Ronnie the Bren Gun girl (Veronica Foster) was a true example of mentor who inspired the confidence of thousands of women to enter the workplace.

  • American finance executive Ashley Fieglein Johnson "thanks her mentors for reminding her to trust her instincts and how to have perspective on her job and goals. A role model may be someone you see yourself in, but it's your mentors who will guide and sponsor you," she says.

  • The Oracle Corporation, located in Redwood Shores, California has decided to build a $43m high school inside its company headquarters in Silicon Valley. One of the reasons for this initiative is so the company can more readily provide mentors to students who want to focus on business plan development and user-experience designs.

  • Award-winning Yale art historian and architect critic, author and former U.S. marine during WWII, whose lectures acted as an inspiration to students for more than 60 years, Connecticut-born American Vincent Scully (1920-2017) was a mentor to Pulitizer Prize winner, New Jersey-born architecture critic and educator Paul Goldberger.

  • Professor of medicine at the Harvard Medical School Dr. Lisa Iezzoni is a mentor to seven-time Paralympic medalist and faculty member at the Harvard Medical School, Dr. Cheri A. Blauwet.

  • Kenyan-born Harvard University scholar and passionate advocate for the role of technological innovation in transforming African countries and named as one of the most influential Africans, Calestous Juma (1953-2017) was described as a great mentor by former student Farai Gundan.

  • Betsy DeVos, Secretary of Education in the cabinet of Donald Trump served as a mentor in Kids Hope USA, an organization that pairs church members with at-risk kids.

  • Public interest lawyer, brain cancer survivor and commissioner for immigrants in New York City, Nisha Agarwal is a mentor to colleague Ady Barkan.

  • Chef Grant Achatz is a mentor to chef Curtis Duffy.

  • John Mackey, author of Conscious Capitalism and creator of Whole Foods Market is a mentor to philosopher, author and wisdom teacher Brian Johnson.

  • Netherlands-born American university scientist who developed the technique of photocrystallorgraphy, Philip Coppens (1930-2017) was described as being "renowned for promoting the discipline, organizing international meetings, and mentoring younger colleagues in his field."

  • Immigrant from Greece Canadian Sam Panopoulos (1934-2017) invented the Hawaiian (pineapple) pizza.?
  • Smithers, British Columbia newspaper editor Joesph Coyle invented the egg carton as a way to settle a dispute between a local farmer and a commercial user about broken eggs being delivered.?
  • Israeli education leader and yeshiva day school principal Rabbi Chaim Feurerman
  • Toronto-based Canadian entrepreneur, professor and public servant James Fleck, known for his mentorship, was elevated to be a Companion of the Order of Canada.

  • Award-winning Professor Dominque Weis, director of the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research (PCIGR) at the University of British Columbia, and the Canada Research Chair in the Geochemistry of the Earth's Mantle, "works hard to mentor and encourage more students, particularly young women, to enter STEAM career path and make a difference in the world of science."

  • History teacher, founder of an alternative school program and school administrator Canadian John Gillett (1924-2017) was described as a mentor to students and teachers.

  • Vice-president of strategic initiatives at Lockheed Martin Canada, Lorraine Ben is a strong advocate for mentoring as a key aspect of the company's efforts to promote STEM learning. "We employe hundreds of STEM professionals who are committed to giving back, volunteering, mentoring and sharing their own personal stories of success. I have personally benefited from mentorship. I have had several mentors over the years, both men and women, who showed me what great leadership looks like. They taught me the compassion and passion are qualities in great leaders, and their guidance gave me the strength to look within myself and focus on my strong points. That's the real value of mentorship, and it's what we want to pass on to young people interested in STEM careers."

  • Canadian mining legend Donald McLeod (1928-2017), who grew up in Stewart, British Columbia, was considered a mentor by his children who followed him into the mining business.

  • Montreal-born Canadian businesswoman Gertrude Kerbel (1923-2017) was known as "a top producer and mentor for close to 30 years."
  • Ontario-born Canadian paddler, putterer and cook Jean Stinson (1922-2017) was described as a mentor in the "Lives Lived" column of the Globe and Mail newspaper.

  • Canadian pediatric physician and professor Bill Wilson (1931-2017) was described as having mentored dozens of pediatricians "with a kind, gentle and steady manner.

  • Canadian inspirational guide and strategic coach Daniel Yolleck (1950-2017) was a mentor to senior executives of many of the largest companies in the world. His obituary described as a person who "taught people who to ask questions of themselves and others. He listened in a way that made people feel heard. He spoke in a way that challenged people to be better, professionally and personally."

  • Squamish, British Columbia-based Carbon Engineering CEO Adrian Corless is a mentor to Geoffrey Holmes, director of development at Carbon Engineering. Mr. Holmes says of his mentor, "We have worked toegether since he took over leadership of the company in Fall 2013. He's tireless, positive and innovative. I've learned a ton under his guidance.

  • Award-winning, New York-born American astrophysicist and writer Carl Sagan (1934-1996) is a mentor to award-winning New York-born American astrophysicist, author and spiritual activist Neil deGrasse Tyson.

  • New Jersey-born educator, author, and a key figure in the development of adventure education Karl Rohnke is a mentor to experiential education entrepreneur and award-winning educator Michelle Cummings.

  • Chicago-born American futuristic architect and executive William Pereira (1909-1985), the builder of the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco, was a mentor to Chinese-American bomber pilot and architect Gin Wong (1922-2017), the designer of the Los Angeles International Airport and other modernist structures.

  • Swiss-born American psychiatrist, most known for her work on death, loss and grieving Elisabeth Kübler-Ross (1926-2004) is a mentor to grief and loss counselor and writer David Kessler.

  • Nobel prize in economics winner Richard Thaler is a mentor to New York-born NY Times journalist David Leonhardt.

  • New York-born American lawyer, civil servant, former director of the FBI and special counsel Robert Mueller is a mentor to Princeton University graduate, American attorney and chief of the criminal fraud division of the U.S. Department of Justice Andrew Weissmann.

  • New York City-born Pulitizer Prize winner, American psychiatrist, parapsychologist, writer and professor at Harvard Medical School, John E. Mack (1929-2004), is a mentor to emotional intelligence expert, author, and participant in PEER (Program for Extraordinary Experience Research) Susan Manewich.

  • Boston-born former New York City police commissioner and businessman William J. Bratton is a mentor to New York City police commissioner James P. O'Neill.

  • Germany-born American health care policy expert and analyst and member of the advisory board of the National Institute for Health Care management, who received an undergraduate degree from the University of Saskatchewan and a doctorate from Yale University Uwe Reinhardt (1937-2017) was a mentor to president and CEO of the National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation Nancy Chockley who said, "He was a generous mentor who offered gentle guidance ot countless health care leaders, including me, and always with a genuine modesty about his role."

  • Award-wining and pioneering California-born neuroscientist and anatomical and behavioral researcher and author Marian Diamond (1926-2017), whose lectures while on the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley were constantly attended by a packed audience of science and non-science students where she demonstrated that the brain can continue to develop at any age and emphasized the "neuroplasticity" of the brain and the importance of growth and learning throughout life was a mentor to thousands of students. Neuroscientist and author Wendy Suzuki, a TEDx talk provider, said of her mentor, "The day that I first heard Dr. Diamond unveil her ideas about the brain was the day I wanted to become a neuroscientist." Dr. Diamond was the first scientist to prove that environmental enrichment influenced the brain's learning capacity. Her research led to the founding of the Anatomy Enrichment Program which functioned for more than 30 years as an outreach program for elementary school children in the Berkeley area. She was also the person most associated with studying part of Albert Einstein's brain and identifying what made his brain significantly different from an average brain.

  • Siemens Canada Dual Education Program, led by the Head of Seimens Canada Engineering & Technology Academy, Thamir Murad, provides a structured mentoring program along with hands-on work experience for new recruits.

  • Canadian professional engineer Endre (Andrew) Bakos, project manager for Toronto Transit Commission mentors young engineeers, particularly newcomes to Canada.

  • Saskatchewan-born Canadian carpenter, raconteur and soldier Michael Danyliuk (1922-2017) was described as a mentor by one of his sons who learned diligence, integrity, service to others, service to God as well as the virtues of discipline and work and the value of humour and compassion. He also learned what it meant to be a man.

  • Canadian public servant Ann Borooah (1954-2017), who devoted her life to public service, was considered "a leader in her field (urban planning), a consummate and down to earth professional, and an enthusiastic mentor."
  • British-born Canadian financial industry businessman Christopher Tidd (1942-2017) was described as a person whom countless colleagues and clients benfitted from because of his wisdom, mentorship, kind nature and generosity of spirit.

  • Lawyer and stepfather John Graham was a mentor to Toronto-born Canadian entrepreneur, businessman, officer of the Order of Canada and philanthropist Ted Rogers (1933-2008), who, in turn, was a mentor to Toronto-born Canadian political leader John Tory. A Junior Fellowship Program at the Ted Rogers Leadership Centre provides an executive mentor to each Junior Fellow.

  • High school band teacher Rick Lingard is a mentor to Castlegar, British Columbia-born Canadian singer-songwriter Shawn Hook.

  • Canadian lawyer who specialized in tax and corporate law and was instrumental in establishing the first Canada-wide law firm Jacques Tétrault (1928-2017) was considered a mentor to staff and law firm mentors in Quebec and beyond and was a "fair and principled leader who was among the first to champion the rights of women partners and promote diversity and work-life balance."

  • Canadian high school teacher and car enthusiast John McCulloch (1948-2017) was described as "an educator and life-long learner, dedicated teacher, coach and mentor."

  • Canadian marine biologist, researcher and university professor John Bradley (JB) Lewis (1925-2017) was a scientist, teacher and mentor and "guided many undergraduates and graduate students in the joys of researching the complexities of marine life."

  • Canadian insurance executive Fordham Robert Blow (1947-2017) "served as a mentor for many colleagues and will be remembered for his contribution to the insurance claims management industry."

  • Award-winning Iowa-born legendary, worldwide influence in the field of evaluation, author of more than 19 books and numerous journal articles and grandfather Daniel L. Stufflebeam (1936-2017) was a mentor to Emeritus researcher and professor emeritus of counselor education and coaching psychology at Western Michigan University Arlen R. Gullickson.

  • As Canada geared up for World War II, the government encouraged women to consider factory work. Veronica Foster (1922-2000), become famous across the country as "Ronnie the Bren Gun girl." She would come to represent and serve as an inspiration for more than 1 million Canadian women who worked in manufacturing plants producing materials for WWII. As artist Andrew Hutchison noted: "Women readily took over these empty posts in almost every capacity – heavy equipment operators, scientists, loggers, shipyard workers, munitions manufactures – nearly any and all positions. Canadian women, for the first time, enjoyed the freedom and experience of working out of the home and of gaining their own paycheque." Later, the United States would create a similar factory girl, also wearing a kerchief and rolled up sleeves. But Rosie the Riveter was fiction. Ronnie the Bren Gun girl (Veronica Foster) was a true example of mentor who inspired the confidence of thousands of women to enter the workplace.

  • American finance executive Ashley Fieglein Johnson "thanks her mentors for reminding her to trust her instincts and how to have perspective on her job and goals. A role model may be someone you see yourself in, but it's your mentors who will guide and sponsor you," she says.

  • The Oracle Corporation, located in Redwood Shores, California has decided to build a $43m high school inside its company headquarters in Silicon Valley. One of the reasons for this initiative is so the company can more readily provide mentors to students who want to focus on business plan development and user-experience designs.

  • Award-winning Yale art historian and architect critic, author and former U.S. marine during WWII, whose lectures acted as an inspiration to students for more than 60 years, Connecticut-born American Vincent Scully (1920-2017) was a mentor to Pulitizer Prize winner, New Jersey-born architecture critic and educator Paul Goldberger.

  • Professor of medicine at the Harvard Medical School Dr. Lisa Iezzoni is a mentor to seven-time Paralympic medalist and faculty member at the Harvard Medical School, Dr. Cheri A. Blauwet.

  • Kenyan-born Harvard University scholar and passionate advocate for the role of technological innovation in transforming African countries and named as one of the most influential Africans, Calestous Juma (1953-2017) was described as a great mentor by former student Farai Gundan.

  • Betsy DeVos, Secretary of Education in the cabinet of Donald Trump served as a mentor in Kids Hope USA, an organization that pairs church members with at-risk kids.

  • Public interest lawyer, brain cancer survivor and commissioner for immigrants in New York City, Nisha Agarwal is a mentor to colleague Ady Barkan.

  • Chef Grant Achatz is a mentor to chef Curtis Duffy.

  • John Mackey, author of Conscious Capitalism and creator of Whole Foods Market is a mentor to philosopher, author and wisdom teacher Brian Johnson.

  • Netherlands-born American university scientist who developed the technique of photocrystallorgraphy, Philip Coppens (1930-2017) was described as being "renowned for promoting the discipline, organizing international meetings, and mentoring younger colleagues in his field."

  • Former Fortune 500 executive Irene Chang Britt is a mentor to advertising sales executive Sarah Elliott.

  • British educator and social entrepreneur Sir Cyril Taylor (1935-2018) was described as a "true mentor" to many who worked with him. Sir Cyril considered Jimmy Coronna, the travel director of the American Institute for Foreign Study, as his mentor.

  • Canadian investment advisor Gerald Morin (1941-2018) was described as "a mentor to many."

  • Aberdeen, Scotland born Canadian university professor and writer Dick Ewen (1925-2018) was known as a much respected mentor during his years as Chair of the English Department at York University.

  • Kingston, Ontario-born brokerage executive Brian Speedie (1949-2018) was described as "a man of immense integrity and a wonderful mentor who was willing to help and teach others at anytime."

  • British scientist, author and humorist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018) was a mentor to hundreds including graduate student and now professor of theoretical cosmology Paul Shard who said, "As a mentor, to see his insightful mind, was a great privilege and he had this tremendous sense of humour. His communication was very slow, but it was always peppered with jokes and ironic remarks and his impish smile. His perseverance and ability to see the lighter side of life in the face of all this was what made him so successful and gave him the great longevity that he had." IV Founder and CEO Nathan Myhrvold was also mentored by Dr. Hawking (as well as Bill Gates). He said,"Stephen was one of my first great mentors....Like-minded advisers are important, but what is often overlooked is the value of having mentors who can teach you something unfamiliar. Who encourage you to view the world through different lenses."

  • Born in Warren, Arkansas, mammologist who studied the history of bats and the effects of radiation contamination on animals Robert Baker (1942-2018) was a professor in the department of biological sciences at Texas Tech University where he mentored dozens of graduate students. The TTU president said that Professor Baker was a "champion of student success and extraordinary mentor of many students who went on to become leading science researchers and educators."

  • Canadian hospitality executive Serge Simard (1955-2018) was known as a "mentor whose warmth, wit, wisdom, directness and joie de vivre touched and inspired all those lucky enough to have crossed his path."

  • National Medal of Science Award-winner Vera Rubin (1928-2016) was a pioneering American astronomer, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, who first uncovered the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion - the so-called Galaxy rotation problem. Although her work was received with great skepticism, it was confirmed time and time again, becoming one of the key pieces of evidence for the existence of dark matter. Ironically, Dr. Rubin wanted to avoid controversial areas of astronomy such as quasars, and focused on the rotation of galaxies. She showed that spiral galaxies rotate quickly enough that they should fly apart if the gravity of their constituent stars was all that was holding them together. So, she inferred the presence of something else - something which today, we call dark matter. Rubin's calculations showed that galaxies must contain at least five to ten times as much dark matter as ordinary matter. Dr. Rubin spent her life advocating for women in science and was a mentor and guiding light for aspiring female astronomers. Dr. Rubin recalled being summoned to meet with an eminent astrophysicist only to learn that they would have to talk in the lobby because women were not allowed upstairs in the offices. Dr. Rubin never forgot. One of the astrophysicists she mentored recalled Dr. Rubin saying, "Don't let anyone keep you down for silly reasons such as who you are. And don't worry abut prizes and fame. The real prize is finding something new out there."

  • Mentor teacher Liz Harrington is a mentor to award-winning middle school teacher and author Heather Wolpert-Gawron. She shares this perspective on mentoring: "Mentors aren't just friends—they are more than that. They are amazing practitioners who pass on their knowledge through informal conversation and everyday modeling. They push back and disagree with you. They help you develop your educational voice. They help hone your academic blade."

  • Toronto-born Crown attorney for the province of Ontario Sarah Jane Welch (1952-2018) was described as a champion and mentor to the Etobicoke Crown's office.

  • Stanford University professor James Gross is a mentor to psychologist and author Kelly McGonigal, the author of The Upside of Stress.

  • Washington-born American founder of Toys "R" Us, Charles Lazarus (1924-2018) is a mentor to American retail toy company executive Norman Ricken; and American businessman Michael Goldstein, who ran the company until 1998.

  • Jacksonville, Florida-born American psychiatrist Beatrix Hamburg (1923-2018) was a pioneering African-American physician who cleared racial barriers, became an important researcher in child development and psychology, and became along with her co-author Dr. Barbara Varenhorst wrote the first article about what was then called "peer counseling." Their article, Peer counseling in the secondary schools: A community mental health project for youth, and peer program development work near Stanford University set the stage for thousands of peer programs across North America.

  • An award winner for her work in ocean preservation efforts and the director of the Bodega Marine Laboratory, marine ecologist Susan Williams (1952-2018) was remembered by the dean of UC Davis's College of Biological Sciences as a caring mentor.

  • Burlington, Ontario-born nurse and executive banker Mary Jo Field (1948-2018) was known for "her penchant for helping, managing and mentoring others."

  • Empire State College in New York State has created the Susan H. Turben Chair in Mentoring to promote excellence in mentoring as the primary relationship between students and faculty. This endowed chair is named in honor of Susan H. Turben, the second graduate of the college and an internationally recognized expert on families and child development.

  • California State University at Fullerton biology professor and co-director of the Southern California Ecosystems Research Program Dr. William Hoese was awarded the 2018 Outstanding College/University Mentor title by the Society for Advancing Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS). Dr. Hoese has mentored over 80 undergraduate students and engages young scientists to complete independent research on marine ecological issues, desert ecology, animal behavior, or plant-animal interactions in coast sage scrub.

  • Regina, Saskatchewan-born Canadian pollster, philanthropist, and marketing legend Angus Reid is a mentor to polling industry executive Steve Mossop.

  • Paul Ross, co-founder of digital agency Reptile is a mentor to Vincent Gagnon, founder of M2GO, an online furniture company. Their mentoring relationship was initiated through Futurpreneur, a Canadian non-profit specializing in helping younger entrepreneurs and where all those who receive financing and access to key resources are paired with a mentor for two years.

  • Montreal-born accountant, lawyer, law professor, Canadian government policy advisor, author and editor Neil Richard Finkelstein (1951-2018), who clerked by the Right Honourable Bora Laskin, Chief Justice of Canada, "said law was a mentoring profession. He invested much time and energy in his role as mentor to young lawyers" at his firm, "as well as with others who came across is path."

  • Canadian media executive and cable pioneer and member of the U.S. Cable Hall of Fame Phil Lind is a mentor to Canadian media executive Colette Watson.

  • Dublin, Ireland-born Canadian lawyer, senior litigation partner and managing partner of his firm Frank Casey (1932-2018) was considered "a strong mentor to his junior colleagues."

  • Calgary, Alberta-born business executive and university professor Leo Donlevy Jr. (1958-2018) was a certified soccer referee, assessor, provincial level instructor and mentor.

  • Canadian furniture maker Peter Coolican is a mentor to Toronto-based hand-crafted furniture designers Chris Charuk and Simon Ford.

  • American landscape architect, journalist and social critic Frederick Law Olmstead (1822-1903), considered the father of American landscape architecture, was a mentor to New Hampshire-born Canadian landscape architect Frederick Gage Todd (1876-1948).

  • Award-winning British biologist and researcher who investigated how environmental pressures affect animals Ben Collen (1978-2018) was described by one of those he mentored as "a great mentor to many + his advice helped shape the path I am on now."

  • Texas-born American astronaut and U.S. Navy test pilot, who piloted the Apollo 12 lunar module and spent more than 10 hours on the surface of the moon, Alan Bean (1932-2018) was a mentor to New York-born American astronaut and professor of mechanical engineering Mike Massimino, who twice flew missions to repair the Hubble Space Telescope. Mr. Massimino said of his mentor, "What was truly extraordinary was his deep caring for others and his willingness to inspire and teach by sharing his personal journey so openly. Anyone who had the opportunity to know Alan was a better person for it, and we were better astronauts by following his example. I am so grateful he was my mentor and friend, and I will miss him terribly."

  • Award-winning Canadian cardiovascular epidemiologic researcher Jack Ven Tu (1965-2018) was described as a superstar and mentor in the field of cardiovascular medicine.

  • Hungary-born Canadian founder of the diabetes research and training centre at the University of Alberta and a captain in the Canadian military during WWII where he served as an interpreter for German generals during their capitulation in Holland, grandfather and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Alberta George Molnar (1922-2018) was a mentor to Canadian physician Alex Rabinovitch.

  • New Jersey-born American educator, author, speaker and marketing consultant Stedman Graham is a mentor to Chris Janson.

  • Champion horse owner, Wall Street trader, winner of the 1984 U.S. Investing Championship and author Martin "Buzzy" Schwartz is a mentor to Charles Patrick Garcia, the author of A Message from Garcia: Yes, You Can Succeed. Mr. Garcia says that he learned four success strategies from his mentor: dream big; have a well-thought out plan; take action; and persevere.

  • Louisville, Kentucky-born American heart surgeon Dr. Charles Huffnagel (1916-1989), who treated U.S. Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy and invented the first artificial heart valve, was a mentor to Dr. Carlos A. Garcia.

  • Pennsylvania-born American clinical psychology, suicidologist, and university professor Dr. Edwin S. Shneidman (1918-2009) is a mentor to speaker and author Dr. Mark Goulston, the author of Just Listen, probably the top selling book on listening in the world.

    "Perhaps in the end, life is just a matter of physics. Life is, after all, Newtons's first law of motion—the law of inertia. The law states that an object in motion stays in motion in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. That's the way we live our lives. We speed on, happily or not, in the same direction until we collide into something that alters our destination. Sometimes that collision hurts, sometimes it doesn't, but if we're lucky, love is that unbalanced force. Love. There is no greater force in the universe. Now if we'll only learn to stop getting out of its way." Richard Paul Evans from his book The Noel Diary. Richard Paul Evans offers mentoring for authors: http://rpeauthormentoring.com/

    "Mentoring is a good way to find out if a career is as glamorous up close as it is from afar. Mentoring helps you see the good, the bad, and the ugly of the field that excites you. It helps you separate the dream from the reality. And if the bad far outweighs the good, you might decide to reevaluate whether this is something you really want." Charles Patrick Garcia, mentored by Martin Buzzy Schwartz.

    "You don't need a mentor who's experienced in your industry. Business skills apply to all types of business and it's often better to get advice from someone who isn't bogged down in your day to day activity. The fundamentals of business – cashflow, new business, marketing, resourcing, taxation – are what you most probably need help with. It can be refreshing to have an outsider's view. You'll be getting a mentor not a magician. Some mentoring relationships fail because the mentee expected the impossible. A mentor can't do your job for you or protect you from the hard times you might be facing. Don't expect a mentor to act like a parent or a friend. Some of the advice you hear will be hard to take. You'll need to be open-minded and avoid getting defensive. Put the time in and try to keep up with any of the tasks they've set for you. You'll get more out of your next meeting if you've considered their previous advice, and tried to put some of it into action." Michelle Wright, the CEO of Cause4.

    "...Even if you haven't yet found a traditional mentor, that doesn't mean you can't benefit from the wisdom of others. Instead, we need a new definition of mentorship. Rather than pining after 'the one' who will answer all your questions and serve as the ultimate role model, it's time to branch out and develop a team of mentors: a group of colleagues who may not be 'perfect' but who have traits you admire and want to learn from. Perhaps one person is great at networking, another excels at social media and a third is a pro at delegation—those are all valuable skills you'd benefit from learning. By making a list of people you admire, at all levels in your organization and in all walks of life, you can form a 'mentor board of directors' and start to assemble your own curriculum." Dorie Clark, author, Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future.

    "To me, the creative economy we're living in today is a key driver not just for economic success, but also for society as a whole. I believe in investing in ideas, in people and in ideals in some cases. I also believe in being a mentor and always seeking out mentors. The work is never done. The key is to always be challenging ourselves and to not be afraid to innovate. Change is scary, but it's a constant in this digital age we're living in." Prem Gill, chief executive officer of Creative BC, an agency that helps to expand British Columbia's movie, music and media industry.

    "A mentor helps you at critical points to step forward. I've had some mentors in my career, and I tend to do that myself especialy for younger people. It's not a matter of being in a constant specific weekly relationship with someone, it's having people who make some key gestures." Rita-Rose Gagné, an executive vice-president of a Canadian global commercial real estate firm.

    "One of the important things to remember for a mentor is that they learn as well from their protégé. In my case, I worked with a brilliant and talented person which allowed me to progress and evolve. I am very grateful." Marie Anna Bacchi, executive vice-president of the Board of Directors of the Italian Chamber of Commerce in Canada.

    "You may never be able to pay your mentors back, but you can recognize what they've done for you by becoming a mentor to others." Adam Toren, investor and co-founder of YoungEntrepreneur.com.

  • Alameda, California-born American aviation pioneer and award-winning WWII pilot James Dolittle (1896-1993) is a mentor to award-winning New Jersey-born American engineer and astronaut Buzz Aldrin, who said "When my father died, Jimmy became a mentor, inspiring me to try and duplicate that mentorship with the astronauts, not just the twelve that landed on the moon."

  • German-born who fled the Nazi regime and wound up in the United States with only hope in his pocket and became a well-known San Francisco developer and restauranteur Rolf Lewis (1924-2015) was a mentor to Al Petri, owner of the famous Alfred's Steakhouse.

  • Suffragist and an early legislative lobbyist in California Sarah Knox-Goodrich was a mentor to the first female lawyer on the West Coast of the United States and pioneered the idea of a public defender system, Clara Shortridge Foltz (1849-1934), who described her mentor as her "earliest appreciative friend who believed in me and never ceased to proclaim me as the 'coming woman.'" (Source: Barbara Allen in the Valparaiso University Law Review, 2011). Ms. Foltz said, "They called me the lady lawyer. A dainty soubriquet that enabled me to maintain a dainty manner as I browbeat my way through the marshes of ignorance and prejudice."

  • Author, Canadian computer scientist and university computer science professor Brian Kernighan is a mentor to author and former Board chair of MentorNet, Mary Fernández. "Part of Brian's mentoring was based on the philosophy of Harry Truman: 'find out what people want, and advise them to do it.'"

  • Business coach Jerry Pico is a mentor to Alan Saporta. In an interview of Mr. Pico by Mr. Saporta, Mr. Pico said, "I would highly encourage as many people to become mentors and equally encourage people to ask for mentors. Not enough people become mentors; and many people are often reluctant to ask someone to become their mentor and really miss out on a potentially life-changing opportunity. Partly because of our busy lives and partly because they aren't sure about what mentoring involves I find people hesitate to participate. Hopefully we can all work to change that!"

  • Ontario-born Canadian businessman and philanthropist Don Rix (1931-2009) is a mentor to Canadian businessman and executive Jason McLean.

  • American entrepreneur, best-selling author of Rich Dad, Poor Dad Robert Kiyosaki is also the author What to Look for in a Great Mentor. Mr. Kiyosaki has said, "The size of your success is measured by the strength of your desire; the size of your dreams; and how you handle disappointment along the way."

  • Janice Voss (1956-2012) was an American engineer and NASA astronaut who flew into space five times and participated in the first Shuttle rendezvous with the Mir space station. After earning her doctorate in aeronautics/astronautics from MIT, she returned to MIT to help students develop tools to navigate careers that will likely take unexpected twists and turns, as her own career did. She shared her work experience with the students, providing real-life examples of both the breadth of the engineering field and the idea that an MIT grad can do anything.

    Her reason for taking time from her own career to mentor future engineers was her way of expressing gratitude. "When I was a graduate student [at MIT], a talk given by astronaut alum Rusty Schweickart was enormously helpful to me. I quote his remarks about how to become an astronaut in talks that I give. I wanted to pay that back to current students at MIT, especially in the form of emphasizing the importance of muddier real-world issues like specifications, budgets, and resource allocation. Plus my own career path was chaotic. I was interested in lots of things, and I wanted to figure out what to do if I didn't become an astronaut." Janice Voss remains a spirit mentor for hundreds of women pursuing careers in science and aspiring to become astronauts.

  • Peer mentor with Deepak Chopra and co-founder of the Chopra Center Dr. David Simon (1951-2012) is a mentor to Alyssa Phillips.

  • American social psychologist, expert in negotiation, and bestselling author Robert Cialdini is a mentor to keynote speaker, trainer, coach, consultant and chief infuence officer Brian Ahearn. A quote from Dr. Cialdini underscores the pay-it-forward nature of true mentorship: "One of the most potent weapons of influence around us is the rule of reciprocation. The rule says that we should try to repay, in kind, what another person has provided us."

  • Author and leadership coach Anastasia Montejano "We are spiritual beings in physical bodies. You chose to come to this planet at this time for a specific reason - to impact the world through your contribution. Your greatest work uses your pain, talents and dreams to serve others - and in turn brings you abundance."
  • Millsap Professor of Divirsity in the department of Human Development and Family Science at the University of Missouri Gustavo Carlo won the 2018 Outstanding Mentor Award from the Society for Research on Adolescence. Dr. Carlo said, "Research shows that prevention programs are more effective and economical. Our evidence shows that if we can develop programs that foster prosocial behaviors (such as helping others), we know the programs will make adolescents less likely to break moral codes, engage in illegal activities like getting drunk and smoking marijuana, and decrease the likelihood that adolescents will use substances in adulthood."
  • Award-winning university professor and expert on learning styles Dr. Rita Dunn (?-2017) was a mentor to more than 160 doctoral students who "now occupy positions of leadership throughout the world", one of whom is education academic Andrea Honigsfeld, who said, "Mentoring allows for building a very special relationship. My most important lesson learned is that even when it looks like the mentor is the expert who guides the novice through some difficult terrains… in reality, mentoring provides an opportunity for learning both ways."

  • Chief of Doctors Without Borders, Canadian physician and member of Canada's Walk of Fame Joanne Liu was mentored by the former minister of health for the Basque government in Spain, Rafael Bengoa. This mentorship was part of an innovative mentoring program created as a collaboration between the Desautels Faculty of Management and the Faculty of Medicine that resulted in McGill University's International Masters for Health Leadership program.

  • Gordon O. Matheson, team doctor for the Golden State Warriors, professor emeritus at the Stanford University School of Medicine, former director of sports medicine at Stanford University and chairman of the board of directors for Calgary-based WorldPlay, a disruptive online-video platform provider, is a mentor with Prime Mentors of Canada.

  • Alan Matheson was honored in 2010 for helping hundreds of students during the Arizona State University law school's 40-year history and received the Outstanding Mentor Award, which has been renamed the Alan Matheson Outstanding Journal Mentor Award.

  • The Trust has created the Mentor of the Year Award in Honor of Robin Carpenter. "Of her many accomplishments, perhaps Robin [Carpenter's] most lasting impact will be felt via the lives she touched as a gifted mentor. Generous with her time, her mind, her network and with a talent for insightful feedback, Robin was regarded as a mentor by many, helping to inspire and propel leaders everywhere she went." Nominations for this award are typically at the end of August of each year.
  • Italian-Canadian former auto company chief executive known often as a corporate fixer Sergio Marchionne (1952-2018) is a mentor to New York City-born Italian industrialist and automobile company board chair John Elkann.

  • Former head winemaker at Dom Pérignon Richard Geoffroy is a mentor to Bordeaux native and head winemaker at Dom Pérignon Vincent Chaperon.

  • Former students and colleagues remember North Carolina-born, fruit fly geneticist and Stanford University professor Bruce Baker (1946-2018) as a generous and encouraging mentor. "He was very much someone who never told you what experiment to do or how to think about a question," said a former graduate student in Baker's lab. "One of his favorite pieces of advice was 'When you have a good hypothesis, don't give it up.'"

  • Distinguished Professor of Neurosurgery and the Residency Program Director at Duke University Medical Center Dr. Michael M. Haglund is a mentor and has been instrumental in finding mentors for others. One of those he mentored, medical student Ashley Choi asked Dr. Haglund, "What is your recipe for successful mentoring?" He replied, "You need to take a personal interest in that person [as a learner]." He explained that in the research setting, he ensures success by providing guidance on projects but encouraging his students to take the lead in planning and executing them, allowing room for failure, and sharing feedback after missteps. In the clinical setting, this translates to teaching his residents to seize opportunities to hone their clinical skills and take their learning to the next level, whether it is through a research fellowship or clinical exchange program. "[When my expertise isn't enough], I put them in contact with people who can further help them grow their strengths and overcome their weaknesses." (Source: Association of Women Surgeons)

  • American science teacher and former NASA worker William Carlock is a mentor to Boston-born American professor of animal science and autism spokesperson Temple Grandin. Dr. Grandin, in responding to a question about what people might gain as a result of viewing her biographical movie (Temple Grandin) said, "I hope they'll get that somebody who is severely autistic really can achieve. Another thing I hope they get is the importance of the mentor teacher. I'm seeing a lot of smart, geeky kids and there's no Dr. Carlock [a high school science teacher played by David Strathairn] around to mentor them. Actually, my teacher was Mr. Carlock. I noticed they'd made that mistake in the script, but I decided he deserved an honorary doctorate so I didn't change it. He was just so important to my success. Now a lot of the science teachers are gone, and they got rid of the auto-shop classes and the welding classes. Those hands-on classes can get a lot of these kids turned on. I'm seeing more and more of the kids with Asperger's [a milder form of autism] getting held back. They are defining themselves as Asperger's first. I define myself as being a scientist first." (Source: TIME Magazine

  • Norwegian scientist who studies cell phone radiation Professor Maria Feychting is a mentor to Oslo University Hospital cardiology department member Lars Klæboe.

  • German-born American biologist, author, and naturalist George Schaller was a mentor to Brooklyn, New York-born American zoologist, wildlife ecologist, chief executive officer of Panthera, a wild cat conservation group, author of The Indomitable Beast: The Remarkable Journey of the Jaguar and called by TIME Magazine "The Indiana Jones of Wildlife Conservation" Alan Rabinowitz (1953-2018).

  • Ontario-born Canadian economist, academic, civil servant, and businessman Grant Reuber (1927-2018) is a mentor to economist and finance executive Peter Martin. Mr. Martin is grateful to his mentor for steering him on an unexpected career path. He said in a remembrance of this mentor to the Globe and Mail: "Grant called me into his office...to ask me about my plans after graduation....With no real forethought, I blurted out tha tI wanted to go to the London School of Economics. He exploded in anger. He must not have expected my reply. When he recovered his composure, he said with total disdain that he would NEVER recommend a top Western (University) student to LSE. it was a time of cultural and social upheaveal, and I think he feared I would get caught up in London's Swinging Sixties counterculture, drinking beer, smoking pot, lazing around, philosophizing about the world order and making nothing of my potential....Grant recommended the Harvard PhD program instead, where he assured me that my marks and his reference would carry weight....Harvard eventually led to my long and successful career in business. I feel very fortunate that he offered personal input that helped me find my way." (Source: Globe and Mail)

Add a Pair

If you know of other mentor pairs that could be added to this list, please e-mail: info@mentors.ca. Include the names of the pair and any sources you have to verify the mentor/partner relationship.


Return to Mentor Pairs Index

Return to Mentor Learning Index

E-mail | Privacy | Search | Site Map | Contact Info

Peer Resources Home | Mentor Index | Coaching Index


Peer Resources - Navigation Tools for the Heart, Mind and Soul™

Copyright © 2018 by Peer Systems Consulting Group Inc.